Rodent and Insect Control in Snoqualmie

snoqualmie-photos-sm

Cascade provides pest control in Snoqualmie for carpenter ants, mouse/mice problems, rats, beetles, moths, flies, termites, wasps, spiders, yellow jackets, hornets and most any pest. To get rid of rats, bugs, insects, spiders or other pests and keep them gone, you need an expert exterminator who can do the job quickly, safely, effectively. We’ve been taking care of people’s residences and commercial properties for over 35 years in Snoqualmie and surrounding communities.

We know how to handle the unique challenges of pest control in the Northwest – aggressive rodent infestations, destructive carpenter ants and other insect populations that rise each season. In fact, we’ve become specialists in rodent control, using methods that are family and pet friendly.

Rodent Control Snoqualmie & Vicinity • Ant Control Snoqualmie & Vicinity

Spider and Other Pest Control Snoqualmie & Vicinity • Cascade’s Services – Snoqualmie & Beyond

RODENT CONTROL – Most rodents encountered within the Snoqualmie area are rats, mice and squirrels. Squirrels are a “nuisance wildlife” problem and are dealt with carefully. Rats and mice, however, cause considerable damage and spread filth and disease. Rats commonly nest in home and commercial building insulation causing it to decompress and lose much of its insulation value. The insulation is also contaminated with rat filth, feces and urine. The cost to replace insulation and decontaminate an attic or crawlspace can be high. Rats (and mice too) also gnaw into electrical insulation on wires causing short circuits and even fires. Rats also contaminate stored food and damage stored items and parts of home (roofing, etc) by gnawing holes.

Cascade Pest Control specializes in rat, rodent and mouse control in the city of Snoqualmie. Cascade’s technicians are uniquely trained to detect rodent issues, assess rat infestations and plan control measures to eradicate the rats or mice. More information about Rodent Control.

ANT CONTROL – Ants problems can come in two forms: nuisance ants that plague your kitchen and other areas inside the home, and wood destroying ants, such as carpenter ants. Carpenter ants are very prevalent throughout Snoqualmie. They lived here for thousands of years in the original forests. But carpenter ants can easily adapt to the wall cavities of homes and move in, then continue to tunnel into the wood eventually causing significant damage requiring a contractor. Other pest ants found in Snoqualmie are filthy nuisances that roam throughout our homes. These species include the “Odorous House Ant” and others. Learn more about how Cascade protects your home from ants here.

OTHER PESTS – Cascade Pest Control also controls Spiders, Earwigs, Cockroaches, Food Pests, Clothes Moths, Yellow Jackets, Bees, Termites and more.

Call Cascade Pest for your pest control needs in Snoqualmie,
at 425-641-6264 or 1-888-989-8979 today.
rodent-control-200  ant-control-200  spider-control-200x59

The City of Snoqualmie – Information and History

Snoqualmie (/snˈkwɔːlmi/ US dict: snō·kwôl′·mē) is a city next to Snoqualmie Falls in King County, Washington. The city is home to the Northwest Railway Museum. The population was of 10,670 at the 2010 census. Movie actress Ella Raines was born in Snoqualmie Falls, a mill town across the Snoqualmie River that is now part of Snoqualmie, on August 6, 1920. Many of the exterior shots for David Lynch’s Twin Peaks television series and movie (Fire Walk with Me) were filmed in Snoqualmie and in the neighboring towns of North Bend and Fall City. ~Wikipedia

Snoqualmie (/snˈkwɔːlmi/ US dict: snō·kwôl′·mē) is a city next to Snoqualmie Falls in King County, Washington. The city is home to the Northwest Railway Museum. The population was of 10,670 at the 2010 census. Movie actress Ella Raines was born in Snoqualmie Falls, a mill town across the Snoqualmie River that is now part of Snoqualmie, on August 6, 1920. Many of the exterior shots for David Lynch’s Twin Peaks television series and movie (Fire Walk with Me) were filmed in Snoqualmie and in the neighboring towns of North Bend and Fall City.

The second written record of the exploration of the Snoqualmie Valley comes from the notes of Samuel Hancock, who ventured up-river with the Snoqualmie tribe in 1851 in search of coal. Near the current location of Meadowbrook Bridge, Hancock was told by his guides that the land was known as “Hyas Kloshe Illahee”, or “good/productive land”. Hancock took this useful information back with him to the area now known as Tacoma.

During the 1850s, tensions were very high between the native populations and the new settlers claiming the land as their own. In 1856, in response to these tensions, Fort Alden was built in the area that would become Snoqualmie. No alliances were made between the tribes in the east and the tribes in the west, and Fort Alden was abandoned (along with other forts built around this time).

The most successful early pioneer in the Valley was Jeremiah Borst, who arrived in the spring of 1858 on his way over the Cedar River trail from the eastern side of the mountains. He settled in the area that formerly held Fort Alden, and used his sales of pigs and apples in Seattle to buy out many of the surrounding land from other settlers.

As successful as farming was, other settlers had different methods of working the land. The very first mill in Snoqualmie was established at the mouth of Tokul Creek around 1872 by Watson Allen. Within 5 years, there were 12 logging operations on the Snoqualmie River, providing lumber to the entire Seattle region. Within 15 years, logging and mill work was employing 140 men and sending millions of board feet of logs down the river.

In 1882, the Hop Growers Association was founded by three Puget Sound partners, who used land purchased from Jeremiah Borst to create a farm that would eventually cover 1,500 acres (6.1 km2), 900 acres (3.6 km2) of which was devoted solely to hops. This extremely successful venture (billed as “The Largest Hop Ranch in the World”) would fall prey to a combination of market and pest factors, and fell into relative obscurity by the end of the 1890s.

By the late 19th century, the Puget Sound region was growing, but bypassed by the major railways. In response, a group of Seattle entrepreneurs funded and built their own railway in an attempt to cross the Cascade mountains. The Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern opened up the vast natural resources Snoqualmie valley to the markets of the world, and brought in tourists from around the world to enjoy the natural beauty of the area, and to marvel at the Falls.

Of course, a by-product of this sudden massive increase in interest in the area was a marked increase in speculation. Originally, the area that would become North Bend was platted as “Snoqualmie” in February 1889 by Will Taylor. The area that is currently Snoqualmie was platted in August of that same year as “Snoqualmie Falls” by investors from Seattle. The oral history of the area places the first residents of Snoqualmie as Edmund and Louisa Kinsey, who established the first hotel, livery, general store, dance hall, post office, and meat market – in addition to helping build the very first church in the town. Two of their sons (out of six children) are most famous for their photography documenting the early timber works in the region.

The first power plant at the Falls was built in the late 1890s by Charles Baker, one of the investors from Seattle who had assisted in the platting of the city. This development provided both power and jobs to the region, and a small company town grew up near the Falls to house the workers. More than 100 years later, Baker’s original generators are still in use by Puget Sound Energy.

The official vote for incorporation of “Snoqualmie Falls” as the City of Snoqualmie occurred in 1903. At the time, land prices had not decreased since initially set in 1889 — prices that did not reflect the financial reality of the region. In response to these high prices, people had created a large “squatting” community, building where they wanted regardless of land ownership or interests. The first challenge that the city council faced was lowering lot prices and migrating these buildings off of the public right-of way, establishing the basic layout of the town that exists to this day.

In 1917, a new all-electric lumber mill (only the second ever in the U.S.) opened across the river from Snoqualmie, along with the company town associated with it, Snoqualmie Falls. For the first half of the century, the timber industry provided the city and Valley with a stable source of income and employment, even as World War I drew away workers and the Great Depression took its toll across the nation.

This prosperity was moderated during the Depression, and with the changes in culture and mobility that took effect in the latter half of the century, Snoqualmie and the majority of the Valley fell into somewhat of a stagnant existence. The city was bypassed when US-10 was built across the Cascades (now Interstate-90), and this led to a shift in commerce to the east (into North Bend) and west (into the Bellevue/Issaquah areas).

By the 1960s, the homes that had made up the company town of Snoqualmie Falls had been moved to other locations within the Valley, and the city’s population had stabilized to a growth rate of roughly 11 people per year over the next 30 years (from 1,216 in 1960 to 1,546 in 1990).

This slow growth cycle continued until the mid-1990s, when the City annexed 1,300 acres (5.3 km2) of undeveloped land that became the site of the current “master-planned” community of Snoqualmie Ridge, now referred to as Snoqualmie Ridge I. The Snoqualmie Ridge I master planned community includes 2,250 dwelling units, a business park, a Neighborhood Center Retail area and the TPC Snoqualmie Ridge, a private, PGA Tour-sanctioned golf course. Snoqualmie Ridge II, annexed in 2004, will contain an additional 1,850 dwelling units, a hospital and a limited amount of additional retail. Snoqualmie Ridge I is completely built-out except for several remaining parcels in the business park. Snoqualmie Ridge II is anticipated to be built-out in 2016-2018. The city council has attempted to balance the desire to retain the rural and historical feel of “historic” Snoqualmie with the needs of a significantly larger population than has existed in the Valley in the past. The city’s historic downtown is undergoing a major renovation to improve its infrastructure and make the area more attractive to visitors to the valley’s many natural attractions.[6]

In 2012 the City of Snoqualmie annexed 593 acres of the former Weyerhaeuser Mill Site and Mill Pond (Borst Lake). The former Mill Office now hosts Dirtfish, an advanced rally car driver training school. The site is one of the largest undeveloped industrial zoned sites in King County, although significant planning and environmental review for potential future uses remains to be done.

Relevant Links for Snoqualmie, WA
City website: http://www.ci.snoqualmie.wa.us/
Rat problem nearby in Snoqualmie valley: http://www.valleyrecord.com/news/30190534.html
Household pests: http://snovalleystar.com/2011/04/20/springtime-brings-warmer-weather-new-household-pests

Cascade provides pest control in Snoqualmie for rats and mice, ants, spiders, yellow jackets, bees and many other pests. Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment!

Cascade Pest Control & Extermination – Snoqualmie Washington

close
Facebook Iconfacebook like buttonYouTube IconTwitter Icontwitter follow buttonVisit Our BlogVisit Our BlogVisit Our Blog
Contact Us NOW