Rodent and Insect Control in Snohomish

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Contact us today to protect your home from rat, rodents, ants & other pests

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 Rodents – Rats/Mice
Termite Protection
Nuisance Wildlife
 Ant Control
Wasps/Bees
Rodent-Proofing
 Spider Control
Other Insects, etc.
Dead Rat Removal/Odor Control

Cascade Pest Control/Exterminators – Cascade has been providing insect & rodent control & protection since 1979. Cascade is local & family-owned.   The Cascade team is dedicated to provide safe & effective pest management solutions and great customer care. Cascade has earned a reputation for respecting the natural environment and your health and safety. Cascade provides Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

rodents, rats, miceRodents – Rats & Mice.   Cascade Pest Control specializes in rodent control, extermination, removal & elimination.   Here in the northwest rodent problems are predominantly the Norway Rat (a.k.a. the brown Rat, sewer Rat & wharf Rat); the Roof Rat (a.k.a the black rat or ship rat); House Mouse; and wild mice, such as the Deer mouse and the Field or Meadow mouse. In most cases by the time we are called there is already an established rat or mouse infestation. Both rats and mice spread disease, however, the deer mouse is a common carrier of hantavirus.   Rat/rodent damage occurs to insulation (in attics & crawlspaces), they gnaw on wires causing shorts and even fires, and they contaminate areas they traverse and nest. Rats & mice take advantage of home construction seeking shelter, nesting material (usually home insulation), and food (leftover dog & cat food, spilt bird seed and more.) Cascade Pest Control provides rat/mice/rodent inspections & assessments, rat/rodent abatement, rodent exclusion (rat- and mouse-proofing or blocking), rodent protection and damage repair. Most rodent damage results in compressed, disrupted or contaminated insulation. Cascade can also help with the “dirty job” of removing dead rats, rodents or other animal carcasses and smell/odor control.   Cascade is also available for rat/rodent abatement—a process of rodent population containment when large structures are cleared for a new construction project.


ant control

Ant Control.   In the greater Puget Sound Region we encounter a number of ant pests, some of which are extremely persistent and annoying, and others cause damage to wood timbers. The most prevalent ants are odorous house ants (insidious tiny black ants), carpenter ants (moderate to large black ants that nest in and damage wood structures), pavement ants, thatching ants (often build stack of fir/pine needles or dried grass), and moisture ants (nest in very wet or decaying wood). There are also other ant species that have been brought into the area which cause some nasty problems (pharaoh ants and other species).
Cascade provides ant pest control (a.k.a. ant extermination, ant removal, ant elimination, ant fumigation, ant eradication). Ant control measures vary widely depending on the species—some primarily rely on special baiting techniques and other, such as carpenter ants, may require injecting wall voids.


spiderSpider Control. Spiders are creepy, cause messy & unsightly webs, and some can inflict harmful bites. Although most all spiders carry some form of venom, few can penetrate human skin to cause any harm. One local species is particularly poisonous, the hobo spider which is also known as the “aggressive house spider” can cause lesions and other symptoms. Black widow spiders are plentiful in eastern Washington but rare in the Puget sound region. Brown recluse spiders—also famous for poisonous bites—are not found in the northwest.   It should be noted, however, that it is possible for these spiders to be carried when moving (furniture & other items) from another part of the country. Much of our spider problems result from webs that obscure windows and other locations, how they creep through a home, and some smaller bites.


termite controlTermites. We have the largest species of termite in the United States here in the northwest. Fortunately, the Dampwood termite only nests in very wet or decaying wood and seldom damages homes. However, we do have the famously destructive termite—the subterranean termite—in various locations throughout the region. These locations are more or less dependent on local soil types. Localities where subterranean termites are most prevalent are West Seattle, areas near Issaquah, various parts of south King county and further south (Pierce & Thurston counties). Other areas occasionally encounter them.
Cascade provides termite control measures (a.k.a. termite treatments, extermination, removal, fumigation & protection.)


wasp, bee, hornet controlWasps & Bees. Wasps are threatening in their aggressive behavior and the very painful stings they inflict. These stings can be particularly threatening to anyone with compromised health issues or who are allergic to the stings.   The most troublesome wasps locally are yellow jackets and bald-faced hornets (actually a variety of yellow jacket). They can nest in wall voids, beneath porches, in ground nests, or nests that hang from roof eaves or tree and bush branches. Yellow jackets are aggressive and nests build up to large numbers—up to 4 or 5 thousand. When nesting above a ceiling or behind a wall they can scratch their way through sheetrock causing a sudden intrusion of many wasps within a home’s living space.
There are also a few a-social wasps which, while menacing-looking, are usually not a problem unless nesting close to a doorway or other place people frequent.
Bees are not normally considered a pest and are valuable pollinators (as are other insects, including butterflies and certain wasps, flies, & beetles.) However, occasionally bees will nest where they cannot be avoided and cannot be moved causing a health-threat, both directly by stings and because some people are highly allergic. Fortunately, this is fairly rare.
Cascade provides wasp, yellow jacket & hornet control (a.k.a. wasp/bee/yellow jacket extermination, elimination, eradication, fumigation & removal.) When treating a wasp nest it is normally important to leave it in place so all foraging wasps will return to the nest and die.   Your Cascade technician can watch for early signs of wasp nest building and/or provide effective control and protection.


cockroach controlOther pests. Here is a partial list of the many other pest issues that we face here in the Puget Sound region:
Bed bugs.
Fabric pests—Carpet beetles and clothes moths.
Food pests (“pantry pests”)—carpet beetles, Indian meal moth, ‘drug store’ beetles.
Nuisance insects—cockroaches, flies, silverfish, cluster flies, overwintering lady-beetles.
Occasional pests—millipedes, centipedes, sow & pill bugs, earwigs.
Wood boring beetles.

Click here to access the Cascade pest library


squirral controlNuisance Wildlife. Occasionally, wildlife animals such as squirrels, raccoons, opossums, birds or other animals nest in and make a mess of our attics, crawlspaces or other locations. These animals are best not killed, but trapped or pushed out. Cascade provides nuisance animal exclusion meaning that they blocked from further entry. Cascade also provides remedial work to clean up filth and contamination, odor problems, and damage—particularly to insulation—that is caused by these creatures.


Exclusion. Closing gaps, cracks and holes that allow rodents and other pest into attics, crawlspaces, wall voids and more is referred to as rodent/rat/mouse exclusion or pest exclusion. It is also called rodent/rat-proofing or pest-proofing or pest “build-out” or pest-blocking.
Homes and other structures are often built with gaps that allow pest entry. Also, wooden siding and some roofing materials are soft enough for rats to gnaw their way in.
Cascade has specialized pest control technicians who have a variety of ways to keep rodents from entering structures, whether tunneling or gnawing their way in. Also, insect pests can be blocked or excluded by sealing small cracks & crevices.   This greatly slows down pest infestations and helps with control.


Dead Rodent/Animal Removal & Odor Control. Unfortunately, rodents and other animals die in attics, wall voids or crawlspaces and create a horrible odor/smell as well as a biohazard. We encounter dead mice; rats; other rodents such as squirrels, raccoons, opossum and birds. It’s mess and a dirty job but your Cascade technician has the equipment to remove the dead animal and its proper disposal. Removing the carcass alone drastically reduces the odor, however, other measures may be called for, both for odor reduction and sanitation (decontamination).

Contact us today to protect your home from rat, rodents, ants & other pests : 1(888) 989-8979.

The City of Snohomish – Information and History

Snohomish is a city in Snohomish County, Washington, United States. The population was 9,098 at the 2010 census. ~ Wikipedia

CITY OF SNOHOMISH

Snohomish is a city in Snohomish County, Washington, United States. The population was 9,098 at the 2010 census. The mayor of Snohomish is Karen Guzak, and the City Manager is Larry Bauman. Snohomish prides itself for its historical downtown, and was once known for its many antique shops when it was known as the “Antique Capital of the Northwest.” The historic business and residential center of the town constitutes the Snohomish Historic District, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Many houses bear plaques with the year the house was built and the name of the family or individual who originally occupied it. Once every year, the city gives tours of the historic houses; one of them, the Blackman House, is a year-round museum. A general aviation airfield, Harvey Airfield, is less than one mile southwest of Downtown Snohomish.

Snohomish was founded roughly in 1858 by Emory C. Ferguson, E. F. Cady and others. It was originally known as Cadyville, and changed its name to Snohomish City in 1871. The name Snohomish is taken from the name of the dominant local Native American tribe “sdoh-doh-hohbsh”, the meaning of which is widely disputed.

One of the first inland cities in the Puget Sound region, Snohomish was built where a planned military road connecting Fort Steilacoom and Fort Bellingham was set to cross the Snohomish River. The road, proposed in the wake of the Pig War, was intended to be built far enough inland to be safe from British naval attacks. Although the road was never completed, Snohomish quickly became a local center of commerce in the expanding region. In 1861, Snohomish County split from Island County and the Village of Snohomish was voted the county seat. It remained as such until 1897 when the county seat was relocated to the larger, yet much newer neighboring city of Everett, Washington after a controversial and contested county-wide vote.

The first school was organized in the city in either 1867 or 1869. The city was finally incorporated in 1890 with Hyrcanus Blackman (who had, since 1888, been Police Chief with the monthly salary of $20.00 per month plus $2.00 for each arrest) as mayor. 1893 saw the construction of a roller skating rink and 1894 the first graduations from Snohomish High School. By 1899 the city of Snohomish was a prosperous town with a population of 2,000, with 25 businesses and 80 homes.

1901 brought Snohomish the first motor car in the county. In 1903 First Street was paved with brick and when it was finished there was a three day celebration. For years afterwards the city’s residents remained so proud of the street that they washed it every week with a fire hose. In 1911 a disastrous fire struck First Street and everything between Avenues B and C was destroyed. The fire began when a small blaze in the Palace Cafe on the South side of the street got out of control on Memorial Day, 1911 at about four a.m. Thirty-five business structures were put out of business, with $173,000 worth of goods destroyed. Despite the disaster the town continued to grow and by 1920 the population grew to a little over 3,000. The population would remain relatively stable for the next 40 years.

The Great Depression was not acutely felt in Snohomish because its economy was mostly agrarian with many family farms. One of the largest employers in Snohomish, Bickford Ford, was founded in 1934 by Lawrence Bickford, the dealership flourished in a period where many auto dealerships dissolved. The 1930s did bring Snohomish some national notice, however, due to baseball great Earl Averill, the only Washingtonian in the Baseball Hall of Fame, who played from 1929 to 1941, mostly with the Cleveland Indians.

The 1960s saw the city of Snohomish enter into a period of decline. Region wide, many people were laid off as the Boeing Company fell on hard times and a great many people left the area. A famous phrase of the day was “Will the last person out of Seattle please turn off the lights?” Snohomish fought back with a redevelopment plan in 1965 that proposed the destruction of the historic structures along First Street in order to make way for a covered mall. The plan was not carried out due to lack of available funds and as a result the area remains today as it has through much of its history.

The general economic malaise of the town continued throughout much of the ’70s, with the downtown area given over to mostly bars and small shops. In 1973, the city adopted a Historic District Ordinance protecting historic buildings and structures from inappropriate alterations and demolitions and encouraging the design of new construction in keeping with the historic character of the district. In 1974, the Historic Business District, a 36-block area, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Larger stores moved away from First Street into newer developments and strip malls that spread out along Second Street and Avenue D.

In 1974 the Seattle-Snohomish mill was totally gutted by fire but was rebuilt by its owners. A severe flood struck the area damaging over 300 homes and killing 3,500 head of livestock in 1975, but the community rallied to support those who were affected. 1976 and 78 brought added community spirit as Snohomish High School won the AAA State football Championships under coach Dick Armstrong.

The 1980s saw renewed vigor in Snohomish when, along with other developments, two 7-Eleven convenience stores and a McDonald’s franchise opened during the first part of the decade. In 1981, Richard Pryor came to town to film parts of the movie Bustin’ Loose and Snohomish received additional attention from Hollywood in the 1983 movie WarGames as the name of the high school from which the character David Lightman, played by Matthew Broderick, hacks into a military computer system. However, the actual high school used in the film is El Segundo High School in El Segundo, California.

Around 1985, the U.S. Route 2 bypass was completed, allowing the traffic which had until then been forced to pass through the town to circumvent the city. This greatly eased the gridlock which had been a part of everyday life and allowed the city to assume the more peaceful character that it has today.

In the 1990s First Street was redeveloped to take advantage of its historic buildings as a tourist attraction. The sidewalks were rebuilt and public restrooms added in order to further serve the community and visitors. The city hall and police station were moved away from First Street and a new fire station was built, allowing those historic buildings to be renovated as well.

Today, Snohomish is very much a model of how cities can reinvigorate their business districts by preserving their historic charm. The town has continued to grow with much of the development spread out along the former route of Route 2, now known as Bickford Avenue. The city has nurtured a great balance between regular businesses in modern facilities which serve the community and specialty shops in the historic part of town to serve the tourist trade. ~ Wikipedia

SNOHOMISH COUNTY
Snohomish County
/snɵˈhoʊmɨʃ/ is a county located in the U.S. state of Washington. As of the 2010 census, the population was 713,335, making it the third-most populous county in Washington. The county seat and largest city is Everett. The county was created out of Island County on January 14, 1861 and is named for the Snohomish tribe.

Snohomish County is included in the Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA Metropolitan Statistical Area.  Snohomish County was created out of Island County on January 14, 1861. The county seat of Snohomish when established was the city of Snohomish, Washington starting in 1861. The city of Everett took the seat in a disputed move in 1895. It was in a vote. One of the first county censuses was taken in 1862 by Sheriff Salem A. Woods. Early important pioneers in the Snohomish County region included E. F. Cady of Snohomish, E. C. Ferguson of Snohomish and Isaac Cathcart. ~ Wikipedia

Relevant Links to Snohomish (City or County):
City website:
http://www.ci.snohomish.wa.us/
County website: http://www.snohomishcountywa.gov/

Cascade provides pest control in Snohomish for rats and mice, ants, spiders, yellow jackets, bees and many other pests. Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment!

Cascade Pest Control & Extermination – Snohomish Washington

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