Rodent and Insect Control In Tacoma


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 Rodents – Rats/Mice
Termite Protection
Nuisance Wildlife
 Ant Control
Wasps/Bees
Rodent-Proofing
 Spider Control
Other Insects, etc.
Dead Rat Removal/Odor Control

Cascade Pest Control/Exterminators – Cascade has been providing insect & rodent control & protection since 1979. Cascade is local & family-owned.   The Cascade team is dedicated to provide safe & effective pest management solutions and great customer care. Cascade has earned a reputation for respecting the natural environment and your health and safety. Cascade provides Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

rodents, rats, miceRodents – Rats & Mice.   Cascade Pest Control specializes in rodent control, extermination, removal & elimination.   Here in the northwest rodent problems are predominantly the Norway Rat (a.k.a. the brown Rat, sewer Rat & wharf Rat); the Roof Rat (a.k.a the black rat or ship rat); House Mouse; and wild mice, such as the Deer mouse and the Field or Meadow mouse. In most cases by the time we are called there is already an established rat or mouse infestation. Both rats and mice spread disease, however, the deer mouse is a common carrier of hantavirus.   Rat/rodent damage occurs to insulation (in attics & crawlspaces), they gnaw on wires causing shorts and even fires, and they contaminate areas they traverse and nest. Rats & mice take advantage of home construction seeking shelter, nesting material (usually home insulation), and food (leftover dog & cat food, spilt bird seed and more.) Cascade Pest Control provides rat/mice/rodent inspections & assessments, rat/rodent abatement, rodent exclusion (rat- and mouse-proofing or blocking), rodent protection and damage repair. Most rodent damage results in compressed, disrupted or contaminated insulation. Cascade can also help with the “dirty job” of removing dead rats, rodents or other animal carcasses and smell/odor control.   Cascade is also available for rat/rodent abatement—a process of rodent population containment when large structures are cleared for a new construction project.


ant control

Ant Control.   In the greater Puget Sound Region we encounter a number of ant pests, some of which are extremely persistent and annoying, and others cause damage to wood timbers. The most prevalent ants are odorous house ants (insidious tiny black ants), carpenter ants (moderate to large black ants that nest in and damage wood structures), pavement ants, thatching ants (often build stack of fir/pine needles or dried grass), and moisture ants (nest in very wet or decaying wood). There are also other ant species that have been brought into the area which cause some nasty problems (pharaoh ants and other species).
Cascade provides ant pest control (a.k.a. ant extermination, ant removal, ant elimination, ant fumigation, ant eradication). Ant control measures vary widely depending on the species—some primarily rely on special baiting techniques and other, such as carpenter ants, may require injecting wall voids.


spiderSpider Control. Spiders are creepy, cause messy & unsightly webs, and some can inflict harmful bites. Although most all spiders carry some form of venom, few can penetrate human skin to cause any harm. One local species is particularly poisonous, the hobo spider which is also known as the “aggressive house spider” can cause lesions and other symptoms. Black widow spiders are plentiful in eastern Washington but rare in the Puget sound region. Brown recluse spiders—also famous for poisonous bites—are not found in the northwest.   It should be noted, however, that it is possible for these spiders to be carried when moving (furniture & other items) from another part of the country. Much of our spider problems result from webs that obscure windows and other locations, how they creep through a home, and some smaller bites.


termite controlTermites. We have the largest species of termite in the United States here in the northwest. Fortunately, the Dampwood termite only nests in very wet or decaying wood and seldom damages homes. However, we do have the famously destructive termite—the subterranean termite—in various locations throughout the region. These locations are more or less dependent on local soil types. Localities where subterranean termites are most prevalent are West Seattle, areas near Issaquah, various parts of south King county and further south (Pierce & Thurston counties). Other areas occasionally encounter them.
Cascade provides termite control measures (a.k.a. termite treatments, extermination, removal, fumigation & protection.)


wasp, bee, hornet controlWasps & Bees. Wasps are threatening in their aggressive behavior and the very painful stings they inflict. These stings can be particularly threatening to anyone with compromised health issues or who are allergic to the stings.   The most troublesome wasps locally are yellow jackets and bald-faced hornets (actually a variety of yellow jacket). They can nest in wall voids, beneath porches, in ground nests, or nests that hang from roof eaves or tree and bush branches. Yellow jackets are aggressive and nests build up to large numbers—up to 4 or 5 thousand. When nesting above a ceiling or behind a wall they can scratch their way through sheetrock causing a sudden intrusion of many wasps within a home’s living space.
There are also a few a-social wasps which, while menacing-looking, are usually not a problem unless nesting close to a doorway or other place people frequent.
Bees are not normally considered a pest and are valuable pollinators (as are other insects, including butterflies and certain wasps, flies, & beetles.) However, occasionally bees will nest where they cannot be avoided and cannot be moved causing a health-threat, both directly by stings and because some people are highly allergic. Fortunately, this is fairly rare.
Cascade provides wasp, yellow jacket & hornet control (a.k.a. wasp/bee/yellow jacket extermination, elimination, eradication, fumigation & removal.) When treating a wasp nest it is normally important to leave it in place so all foraging wasps will return to the nest and die.   Your Cascade technician can watch for early signs of wasp nest building and/or provide effective control and protection.


cockroach controlOther pests. Here is a partial list of the many other pest issues that we face here in the Puget Sound region:
Bed bugs.
Fabric pests—Carpet beetles and clothes moths.
Food pests (“pantry pests”)—carpet beetles, Indian meal moth, ‘drug store’ beetles.
Nuisance insects—cockroaches, flies, silverfish, cluster flies, overwintering lady-beetles.
Occasional pests—millipedes, centipedes, sow & pill bugs, earwigs.
Wood boring beetles.

Click here to access the Cascade pest library


squirral controlNuisance Wildlife. Occasionally, wildlife animals such as squirrels, raccoons, opossums, birds or other animals nest in and make a mess of our attics, crawlspaces or other locations. These animals are best not killed, but trapped or pushed out. Cascade provides nuisance animal exclusion meaning that they blocked from further entry. Cascade also provides remedial work to clean up filth and contamination, odor problems, and damage—particularly to insulation—that is caused by these creatures.


Exclusion. Closing gaps, cracks and holes that allow rodents and other pest into attics, crawlspaces, wall voids and more is referred to as rodent/rat/mouse exclusion or pest exclusion. It is also called rodent/rat-proofing or pest-proofing or pest “build-out” or pest-blocking.
Homes and other structures are often built with gaps that allow pest entry. Also, wooden siding and some roofing materials are soft enough for rats to gnaw their way in.
Cascade has specialized pest control technicians who have a variety of ways to keep rodents from entering structures, whether tunneling or gnawing their way in. Also, insect pests can be blocked or excluded by sealing small cracks & crevices.   This greatly slows down pest infestations and helps with control.


Dead Rodent/Animal Removal & Odor Control. Unfortunately, rodents and other animals die in attics, wall voids or crawlspaces and create a horrible odor/smell as well as a biohazard. We encounter dead mice; rats; other rodents such as squirrels, raccoons, opossum and birds. It’s mess and a dirty job but your Cascade technician has the equipment to remove the dead animal and its proper disposal. Removing the carcass alone drastically reduces the odor, however, other measures may be called for, both for odor reduction and sanitation (decontamination).

Contact us today to protect your home from rat, rodents, ants & other pests : 1(888) 989-8979.

History of Tacoma, WA

Tacoma (/təˈkoʊmə/ tə-koh-mə) is a mid-sized urban port city in and the county seat of Pierce County, Washington, United States. The city is on Washington’s Puget Sound, 32 miles (51 km) southwest of Seattle, 31 miles (50 km) northeast of the state capital, Olympia, and 58 miles (93 km) northwest of Mount Rainier National Park. The population was 198,397, according to the 2010 census. Tacoma is the second-largest city in the Puget Sound area and the third largest in the state. Tacoma also serves as the center of business activity for the South Sound region, which has a population of around 1 million people.

Tacoma adopted its name after the nearby Mount Rainier, originally called Takhoma or Tahoma. It is locally known as the “City of Destiny” because the area was chosen to be the western terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad in the late 19th century. The decision of the railroad was influenced by Tacoma’s neighboring deep-water harbor, Commencement Bay. By connecting the bay with the railroad, Tacoma’s motto became “When rails meet sails.” Today, Commencement Bay serves the Port of Tacoma, a center of international trade on the Pacific Coast and Washington State’s largest port.

Like most central cities, Tacoma suffered a prolonged decline in the mid-20th century as a result of suburbanization and divestment. Since the 1990s, developments in the downtown core include the University of Washington TacomaTacoma Link, the first modern electric light rail service in the state; the state’s highest density of art and history museums; and a restored urban waterfront, the Thea Foss Waterway. Neighborhoods such as the 6th Avenue District have become revitalized.

Tacoma-Pierce County has been named one of the most livable areas in the United States. In 2006, Tacoma was listed as one of the “most walkable” cities in the country. That same year, the women’s magazine Self named Tacoma the “Most Sexually Healthy City” in the United States. In contrast, Tacoma was also ranked as the “most stressed-out” city in the country in a 2004 survey.

Tacoma gained notoriety in 1940 for the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, which earned the nickname “Galloping Gertie”.  ~ source: Wikipedia

City of Tacoma, WA

The city of Tacoma and surrounding areas were inhabited for thousands of years by American Indians, predominantly the Puyallup people, who lived in settlements on the delta.

In 1852, a Swede named Nicolas Delin constructed a sawmill powered by water on a creek near the head of Commencement Bay, but the small settlement that grew up around it was abandoned during the Indian War of 1855–56. In 1864, pioneer and postmaster Job Carr, a Civil War veteran and land speculator who hoped to profit from the selection of Commencement Bay as the terminus of the Transcontinental Railroad, built a cabin (a replica of Job Carr’s cabin, which also served as Tacoma’s first post office, was erected in “Old Town” in 2000 near the original site), and later sold most of his claim to developer Morton M. McCarver (1807–1875), who named his project Tacoma City, derived from the indigenous name for the mountain.

Tacoma was incorporated on November 12, 1875, following the merger of Old Tacoma and New Tacoma on January 7, 1884. Its hopes to be the “City of Destiny” were stimulated by selection in 1873 as the western terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad, thanks to lobbying by McCarver, future mayor John Wilson Sprague, and others. The transcontinental link was effected in 1887, but the railroad built its depot on “New Tacoma”, two miles (3 km) south of the Carr-McCarver development. The two communities grew together and joined. The population grew from 1,098 in 1880 to 36,006 in 1890. Rudyard Kipling visited Tacoma in 1889 and said it was “literally staggering under a boom of the boomiest”.

The Commencement Bay Land and Improvement Co. played a major role in the city’s early growth.

George Francis Train was a resident for a few years in the late 19th century. In 1890, he staged a global circumnavigation starting and ending in Tacoma to promote the city. A plaque in downtown Tacoma marks the start and finish line.

In November 1885, white citizens led by then-mayor Jacob Weisbach expelled several hundred Chinese residents peacefully living in the city. As described by the account prepared by the Chinese Reconciliation Project Foundation, on the morning of November 3, 1885, “several hundred men, led by the mayor and other city officials, evicted the Chinese from their homes, corralled them at 7th Street and Pacific Avenue, marched them to the railway station at Lakeview and forced them aboard the morning train to Portland, Oregon. The next day two Chinese settlements were burned to the ground.”

The discovery of gold in the Klondike in 1898 led Tacoma’s prominence in the region to be eclipsed by the booming development of Seattle.

20th Century

A major tragedy marred the end of the 19th century, when a streetcar accident resulted in significant loss of life on July 4, 1900.

Downtown, early 20th century

From May to August 1907, the city was the site of a smelter workers’ strike organized by Local 545 of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), with the goal of a fifty-cent per day pay raise. The strike was strongly opposed by the local business community, and the smelter owners threatened to blacklist organizers and union officials. The IWW opposed this move by trying to persuade inbound workers to avoid Tacoma for the duration of the strike. [15] By August, the strike had ended without meeting its demands.

Tacoma was briefly (1915–22) a major destination for big-time automobile racing, with one of the nation’s top-rated racing venues located just outside the city limits, at the site of today’s Clover Park Technical College.

The Great Depression

The 1929 crash of the Stock Market, also known as the Great Depression, was only the first event in a series of bad misfortunes to hit Tacoma in the winter of 1929–30. One of the coldest winters on record, Tacoma experienced mass power outages and eventually the shutdown of major power supply dams, leaving the city without sufficient power and heat.  During the 30-day power shortage in the winter of 1929 and 1930, Tacoma was provided with electricity from the engines of the aircraft carrier USS Lexington.

A power grid failure paired with a newly rewritten city constitution put into place in order to keep political power away from a single entity such as the railroad, created a standstill in the ability to further the local economy. Local businesses felt the pinch as the sudden stop of loans limited progression of expansion and renewal funds for maintenance leading to foreclosures. Families all over the city experience the fallout of economic depression growing the problem of “where” and “how” breadwinners were going to find the food that their families needed to survive. Local makeshift inner shanty town politics began to develop as the occupants needed some form of leadership to keep the peace.

Tacoma’s own Hooverville

At the intersection of Dock Street EXD and East D Street in the train yard, a shantytown became the solution to the growing scar of the depression. Tacoma’s Hooverville grew in 1924 as the homeless community moved onto the waterfront as a place to settle. The population boomed in November 1930 through early 1931 as families from the neighboring McKinley and Hill Top areas fell victim to eviction notices and the inability to find steady work.

Collecting scraps of metal and wood from local lumber stores and recycling centers, families began building shanties (shacks) in order to supply a roof over their heads. Alcohol and suicide became a common event in the Hooverville that eventually gave it its nickname of “Hollywood”, because of the Hollywood-style crimes and events taking place in the camp. It would not be until 1956 when the last occupant of “Hollywood” was evicted and the police used fire to level the grounds and make room for industrial growth.

Timeline events of Tacoma’s Hooverville “Hollywood on the Tide Flats”

  • 1924– Tacoma starts feeling the coming pinch of the economic crises.
  • 1927– Tacoma’s Hooverville is coined “Hollywood” due to the “Hollywood” type crimes coming from the camp.
  • 1932–34– Hollywood breaks out in a rash of problems stemming from alcohol and suicides.
  • 1937– Tacoma holds a committee to assess the “Real Social Problem” in regards to the shantytown.
  • 1940– After eviction notices fail to evacuate the Hooverville, the local police department burns down Hooverville, their first attempt.
  • 1956– The last occupant of Hooverville is removed and the police, for a second time, burn down the remains and flatten the area for industrial growth.

(Timeline constructed from following sources: Tacoma News Tribune (1940–74)[22] and The Tacoma Daily Ledger (1924–40)

In 1935, Tacoma received national attention when George Weyerhaeuser, the nine-year-old son of prominent lumber industry executive J.P. Weyerhaeuser, was kidnapped] while walking home from school. FBI agents from Portland handled the case, in which payment of a ransom of $200,000 secured release of the victim. Four persons were apprehended and convicted. The last to be released was paroled from McNeil Island in 1963. George Weyerhaeuser went on to become chairman of the Board of the Weyerhaeuser Company.

In 1951, an investigation by a state legislative committee revealed widespread corruption in Tacoma’s government, which had been organized commission-style since 1910. Voters approved a mayor and city-manager system in 1952.

Tacoma was featured prominently in the garage rock sound of the mid-1960s with bands including The Wailers and The Sonics. The surf rock band The Ventures were also from Tacoma.

Downtown Tacoma experienced a long decline through the mid-20th century. Harold Moss, later the city’s mayor, characterized late 1970s Tacoma as looking “bombed out” like “downtown Beirut” (a reference to the Lebanese Civil War that occurred at that time); “Streets were abandoned, storefronts were abandoned and City Hall was the headstone and Union Station the footstone” on the grave of downtown.

Aerial view of central Tacoma. Commencement Bay is at lower right.

This picture began to change somewhere around 1990. Among the projects associated with the downtown renaissance were the federal courthouse in the former Union Station (1991); the Washington State History Museum (1996), echoing the architecture of Union Station; the adaptation of a group of century-old brick warehouses into the University of Washington Tacoma campus; the numerous privately financed renovation projects near that UW Tacoma campus; the Museum of Glass (2002); the Tacoma Art Museum (2003); and the region’s first light-rail line (2003).

The first local referendums in the U.S. on computerized voting occurred in Tacoma in 1982 and 1987. On both occasions, voters rejected 3-1 the computer voting systems that local officials sought to purchase. The campaigns, organized by Eleanora Ballasiotes, a conservative Republican, focused on the vulnerabilities of computers to fraud.

In 1998, Tacoma installed a high-speed fiber optic network throughout the community. The municipally owned power company, Tacoma Power, wired the city.

21st Century

Tacoma’s Hilltop neighborhood started struggling with crime in the 1980s and early 1990s. Due to its high crime rate, Washington residents nicknamed the city “Tacompton”, in reference to Compton, California. The beginning of the 21st Century has seen a marked reduction in crime, as neighborhoods have enacted community policing and other policies. Bill Baarsma (mayor from 2002–2010) is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition, a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of “making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets.” The coalition was co-chaired by Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

In 2004, Tacoma was ranked among the top 30 Most Livable Communities in an annual survey conducted by the Partners for Livable Communities.  In 2009 Tacoma elected its second African-American mayor, Marilyn Strickland.

Downtown revival

Hotel Bostwick, located in Tacoma

Beginning in the early 1990s, city residents and planners have taken steps to revitalize Tacoma, particularly its downtown. The University of Washington established a branch campus in Tacoma in 1990. The same year, Union Station (Tacoma) was restored. The Museum of Glass opened in downtown Tacoma in 2002, showing glass art from the region and around the world. It includes a glassblowing studio and is connected to the rest of the Museum District by the Bridge of Glass, which features works by Tacoma native glass artist Dale Chihuly.

Tacoma’s downtown Cultural District is the site of the Washington State History Museum (1996) and the Tacoma Art Museum (2013 ). America’s Car Museum was completed in late 2011 and resides near the Tacoma Dome in Tacoma. The glass and steel Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center opened in November 2004.

The Theatre District of downtown Tacoma is anchored by the Pantages Theater (first opened in 1918). The Broadway Center for the Performing Arts manages the Pantages, the Rialto Theater, and the Theatre on the Square, as well as Tacoma Little Theatre. Other attractions include the Grand Cinema and the Temple Theatre.

City of Tacoma official website http://www.cityoftacoma.org/

City of Tacoma Twitter Page https://twitter.com/CityofTacoma?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

Things to do in Tacoma http://www.traveltacoma.com/

Best of Tacoma https://www.tripadvisor.com/Tourism-g58775-Tacoma_Washington-Vacations.html

City Data for Tacoma http://www.city-data.com/city/Tacoma-Washington.html

Port of Tacoma http://www.portoftacoma.com/

Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department: Rodent Prevention http://www.tpchd.org/resources/rodent-prevention/

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