Rodent and Insect Control in Mason County (Shelton) and Gig Harbor Area

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Contact us today to protect your home from rat, rodents, ants & other pests

Contact Us Locally at 1-360-277-1641

 Rodents – Rats/Mice
Termite Protection
Nuisance Wildlife
 Ant Control
Wasps/Bees
Rodent-Proofing
 Spider Control
Other Insects, etc.
Dead Rat Removal/Odor Control

Cascade Pest Control/Exterminators – Cascade has been providing insect & rodent control & protection since 1979. Cascade is local & family-owned.   The Cascade team is dedicated to provide safe & effective pest management solutions and great customer care. Cascade has earned a reputation for respecting the natural environment and your health and safety. Cascade provides Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

rodents, rats, miceRodents – Rats & Mice.   Cascade Pest Control specializes in rodent control, extermination, removal & elimination.   Here in the northwest rodent problems are predominantly the Norway Rat (a.k.a. the brown Rat, sewer Rat & wharf Rat); the Roof Rat (a.k.a the black rat or ship rat); House Mouse; and wild mice, such as the Deer mouse and the Field or Meadow mouse. In most cases by the time we are called there is already an established rat or mouse infestation. Both rats and mice spread disease, however, the deer mouse is a common carrier of hantavirus.   Rat/rodent damage occurs to insulation (in attics & crawlspaces), they gnaw on wires causing shorts and even fires, and they contaminate areas they traverse and nest. Rats & mice take advantage of home construction seeking shelter, nesting material (usually home insulation), and food (leftover dog & cat food, spilt bird seed and more.) Cascade Pest Control provides rat/mice/rodent inspections & assessments, rat/rodent abatement, rodent exclusion (rat- and mouse-proofing or blocking), rodent protection and damage repair. Most rodent damage results in compressed, disrupted or contaminated insulation. Cascade can also help with the “dirty job” of removing dead rats, rodents or other animal carcasses and smell/odor control.   Cascade is also available for rat/rodent abatement—a process of rodent population containment when large structures are cleared for a new construction project.


ant control

Ant Control.   In the greater Puget Sound Region we encounter a number of ant pests, some of which are extremely persistent and annoying, and others cause damage to wood timbers. The most prevalent ants are odorous house ants (insidious tiny black ants), carpenter ants (moderate to large black ants that nest in and damage wood structures), pavement ants, thatching ants (often build stack of fir/pine needles or dried grass), and moisture ants (nest in very wet or decaying wood). There are also other ant species that have been brought into the area which cause some nasty problems (pharaoh ants and other species).
Cascade provides ant pest control (a.k.a. ant extermination, ant removal, ant elimination, ant fumigation, ant eradication). Ant control measures vary widely depending on the species—some primarily rely on special baiting techniques and other, such as carpenter ants, may require injecting wall voids.


spiderSpider Control. Spiders are creepy, cause messy & unsightly webs, and some can inflict harmful bites. Although most all spiders carry some form of venom, few can penetrate human skin to cause any harm. One local species is particularly poisonous, the hobo spider which is also known as the “aggressive house spider” can cause lesions and other symptoms. Black widow spiders are plentiful in eastern Washington but rare in the Puget sound region. Brown recluse spiders—also famous for poisonous bites—are not found in the northwest.   It should be noted, however, that it is possible for these spiders to be carried when moving (furniture & other items) from another part of the country. Much of our spider problems result from webs that obscure windows and other locations, how they creep through a home, and some smaller bites.


termite controlTermites. We have the largest species of termite in the United States here in the northwest. Fortunately, the Dampwood termite only nests in very wet or decaying wood and seldom damages homes. However, we do have the famously destructive termite—the subterranean termite—in various locations throughout the region. These locations are more or less dependent on local soil types. Localities where subterranean termites are most prevalent are West Seattle, areas near Issaquah, various parts of south King county and further south (Pierce & Thurston counties). Other areas occasionally encounter them.
Cascade provides termite control measures (a.k.a. termite treatments, extermination, removal, fumigation & protection.)


wasp, bee, hornet controlWasps & Bees. Wasps are threatening in their aggressive behavior and the very painful stings they inflict. These stings can be particularly threatening to anyone with compromised health issues or who are allergic to the stings.   The most troublesome wasps locally are yellow jackets and bald-faced hornets (actually a variety of yellow jacket). They can nest in wall voids, beneath porches, in ground nests, or nests that hang from roof eaves or tree and bush branches. Yellow jackets are aggressive and nests build up to large numbers—up to 4 or 5 thousand. When nesting above a ceiling or behind a wall they can scratch their way through sheetrock causing a sudden intrusion of many wasps within a home’s living space.
There are also a few a-social wasps which, while menacing-looking, are usually not a problem unless nesting close to a doorway or other place people frequent.
Bees are not normally considered a pest and are valuable pollinators (as are other insects, including butterflies and certain wasps, flies, & beetles.) However, occasionally bees will nest where they cannot be avoided and cannot be moved causing a health-threat, both directly by stings and because some people are highly allergic. Fortunately, this is fairly rare.
Cascade provides wasp, yellow jacket & hornet control (a.k.a. wasp/bee/yellow jacket extermination, elimination, eradication, fumigation & removal.) When treating a wasp nest it is normally important to leave it in place so all foraging wasps will return to the nest and die.   Your Cascade technician can watch for early signs of wasp nest building and/or provide effective control and protection.


cockroach controlOther pests. Here is a partial list of the many other pest issues that we face here in the Puget Sound region:
Bed bugs.
Fabric pests—Carpet beetles and clothes moths.
Food pests (“pantry pests”)—carpet beetles, Indian meal moth, ‘drug store’ beetles.
Nuisance insects—cockroaches, flies, silverfish, cluster flies, overwintering lady-beetles.
Occasional pests—millipedes, centipedes, sow & pill bugs, earwigs.
Wood boring beetles.

Click here to access the Cascade pest library


squirral controlNuisance Wildlife. Occasionally, wildlife animals such as squirrels, raccoons, opossums, birds or other animals nest in and make a mess of our attics, crawlspaces or other locations. These animals are best not killed, but trapped or pushed out. Cascade provides nuisance animal exclusion meaning that they blocked from further entry. Cascade also provides remedial work to clean up filth and contamination, odor problems, and damage—particularly to insulation—that is caused by these creatures.


Exclusion. Closing gaps, cracks and holes that allow rodents and other pest into attics, crawlspaces, wall voids and more is referred to as rodent/rat/mouse exclusion or pest exclusion. It is also called rodent/rat-proofing or pest-proofing or pest “build-out” or pest-blocking.
Homes and other structures are often built with gaps that allow pest entry. Also, wooden siding and some roofing materials are soft enough for rats to gnaw their way in.
Cascade has specialized pest control technicians who have a variety of ways to keep rodents from entering structures, whether tunneling or gnawing their way in. Also, insect pests can be blocked or excluded by sealing small cracks & crevices.   This greatly slows down pest infestations and helps with control.


Dead Rodent/Animal Removal & Odor Control. Unfortunately, rodents and other animals die in attics, wall voids or crawlspaces and create a horrible odor/smell as well as a biohazard. We encounter dead mice; rats; other rodents such as squirrels, raccoons, opossum and birds. It’s mess and a dirty job but your Cascade technician has the equipment to remove the dead animal and its proper disposal. Removing the carcass alone drastically reduces the odor, however, other measures may be called for, both for odor reduction and sanitation (decontamination).

Contact us today to protect your home from rat, rodents, ants & other pests : 1(888) 989-8979.

Shelton is the county seat of Mason CountyWashingtonUnited States.[5] Shelton is the westernmost city on Puget Sound. The population was 9,834 at the 2010 census. In terms of population, the city is ranked 161 out of approximately 500 municipalities in Washington. Shelton has a unique form of government in the State of Washington, being the only city in the state which still retains the commission form of government.

History Shelton was officially incorporated in 1890. The city was named after David Shelton, a delegate to the territorial legislature.

Shelton was once served by a small fleet of steamboats which was part of the Puget Sound Mosquito Fleet. These boats included the Old SettlerIreneWillieCity of SheltonMarianClara Brown, and S.G. Simpson.]The economy was built around logging, farming, dairying and ranching as well as oyster cultivation. The Simpson Timber Company mill on Puget Sound‘s Oakland Bay dominated the landscape of the downtown area; the mill was sold to Sierra Pacific Industries in 2015, who are currently building a new mill. Shelton also identifies itself as the “Christmas Tree Capital.

Formally incorporated in the 1890s, Shelton’s municipal government is run in the Mayor/Commission form.  It is the last city in the State of Washington to use this form of government.          ~Wikipedia

City of Shelton http://www.ci.shelton.wa.us/
Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shelton,_Washington
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/places/Things-to-do-in-Shelton-Washington/107549569274126/
Shelton Guide http://sheltonguide.com/

Belfair is a census-designated place in Mason County, WashingtonUnited States. Located on the Union River, headwaters of the Hood Canal, a branch of Puget Sound, it serves as the commercial center of North Mason County. The population of the surrounding area swells in the summertime as tourists and nature lovers flock to the Canal and the Olympic Peninsula. The population within the Urban Growth Area (UGA) is an estimated 700.

Belfair is located on an isthmus connecting the Kitsap and Olympic Peninsula. It receives an average rainfall of 60 inches (1,500 mm) yearly and has a growing season of 212 days.

Mason Lake is 8 miles (13 km) southwest of Belfair.

Belfair is the home of former U.S. Representative Norm Dicks. Belfair was also home to Noah Ashenhurst, formerly an English teacher at North Mason High School and award-winning author of the novel Comfort FoodBelfair is also the hometown of 6 Time AMA National Champion Jason Raines and the Illustrator of numerous children’s books Daniel Lane.

Belfair was originally called Clifton, as were several other towns in the state. To avoid confusion, it was renamed in 1925 by Mrs. Murray, the postmaster, who submitted the name Belfair from a book that she was then reading.

Belfair is home to “The Taste of Hood Canal”, an annual event falling on the second Saturday in August. This festival features local artists, foods, a classic car show and is sponsored by the North Mason Rotary Club.

Belfair has a high school (North Mason High School), a middle school (Hawkins Middle School), and two elementary schools (Sand Hill Elementary is located on Sand Hill Road and Belfair Elementary is located across from the Mary E. Theler Community Center in town).

Belfair is the regional service hub for North Mason County. Harrison Hospital operates an urgent care facility in Belfair. Local doctors offices are in town along with other professional services. The town has local and chain restaurants along with two major grocery stores (QFC and Safeway). Local shopping includes gift stores. Timberland Regional Library has a local branch in Belfair. Several public golf courses are nearby, including McCormick Woods, Gold Mountain, Alderbrook, Trophy Lake, Horseshoe Lake, and Lakeland Village. Gold Mountain is ranked on the top 100 list of public courses.

At the south end of Belfair the local community center is called the Mary E. Theler Community Center. Four separate walking trails meandering through 135 acres (0.55 km2) of tidal wetlands, offering boardwalks and well-groomed paths with scenic views of Hood Canal, Union River, and a tidal estuary. Birders flock to the area to view kingfishers, heron, bald eagles and other birds. The wetlands and surrounding lowland forest are also home to fox, deer, and other creatures. Local vendors, farmers and crafters can be found every Saturday at the “Belfair Farmer’s Market” during the summer months in the Theler parking lot.

Washington State Route 3 is the main road leading into Belfair, from Bremerton and Gorst in the north, and Allyn in the south. Washington State Route 106 also starts at the south end of Belfair, leading toward Union, the next town along the south shore of Hood Canal. Washington State Route 300 begins in Belfair and runs along the north shore of Hood Canal, providing access to Tahuya and Dewatto Bay.

Belfair serves as a gateway town for the Hood Canal region, and is the last town with services before visitors reach Tahuya State Forest, famed for its miles of off-road vehicle and mountain biking trails.

Belfair “City Data” http://www.city-data.com/city/Belfair-Washington.html
Experience Belfair http://www.experiencewa.com/cities/belfair
Belfair Facebook http://www.experiencewa.com/cities/belfair

Mason County, WA

Mason County is a county located in the U.S. state of Washington. As of the 2010 census, the population was 60,699. The county seat and only incorporated city is Shelton. The county was formed out of King County on March 13, 1854. Originally named Sawamish County, it took its present name in 1864 in honor of Charles H. Mason, the first Secretary of Washington Territory.

Mason County comprises the Shelton, WA Micropolitan Statistical Area and is included in the SeattleTacoma, WA Combined Statistical Area.    ~Wikipedia

Mason County Government http://www.co.mason.wa.us/
Shelton/Mason County Chamber of Commerce http://www.sheltonchamber.org/

Pest Control https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pest_control
Rodents https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodent
Rat https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rat
Mouse/Mice https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse
Ants https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ant
Termites https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse

Gig Harbor

Gig Harbor is the name of both a bay on Puget Sound and a city on its shore in Pierce CountyWashingtonUnited States. The population was 7,126 at the 2010 census.

Gig Harbor is one of several cities and towns that claim to be “the gateway to the Olympic Peninsula“. Due to its close access to several state and city parks, and historic waterfront that includes boutiques and fine dining, it has become a popular tourist destination. Gig Harbor is located along State Route 16, about six miles (10 km) from its origin at Interstate 5, over the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. A $1.2 billion project to add a second span to the bridge was completed in 2007.[5] During off-peak traffic times, Tacoma can be reached in five minutes and Seattle in just under an hour.

Based on per capita income, Gig Harbor ranks 49th of 522 areas in the state of Washington to be ranked.

History

During a heavy storm in 1840, Captain Charles Wilkes brought the Captain’s gig (small boat) into the harbor for protection. Later, with the publication of Wilkes 1841 map of the Oregon Territory, he named the sheltered bay Gig Harbor.

1867 brought fisherman Samuel Jerisich to the Gig Harbor area, along with many other immigrants from Sweden, Norway and Croatia. The town was platted in 1888 by Alfred M. Burnham.[6]

Gig Harbor was officially incorporated on July 12, 1946. Commercial fishing, boat building and logging dominated the economy until the construction of the first Tacoma Narrows Bridge in 1940. Until then, the primary method of transportation between Gig Harbor and the economic center of nearby Tacoma was by steamship. Starting in 1836 steamships started plying the waters of Puget Sound and quickly developed into what was eventually dubbed “The Mosquito Fleet.” Gig Harbor, isolated from Tacoma and Seattle by Puget Sound and the Tacoma Narrows, could not be reached by automobile or horseback except via a very long and arduous trip south around Puget Sound and Hammersly Inlet. The boom was to be short lived as the first bridge collapsed just months after it was completed. The resource demands of World War II prevented another bridge from being built until 1950. Between the time when the first bridge collapsed and when the second bridge was completed, a state run ferry service delivered drivers directly into downtown Gig Harbor. Remains of the ferry dock can still be seen just outside the mouth of the harbor at the southeast end of Harborview Drive. The area has been turned into a small park, where the public can see a panoramic view of the Cascade Mountains, Point Defiance and Mount Rainier.

After the completion of the replacement bridge in 1950, Gig Harbor and the surrounding area quickly began to develop as a suburb of neighboring Tacoma. First the area saw substantial residential development as families retreated from Tacoma in favor of the tree-lined neighborhoods and waterfront lots available on the Gig Harbor Peninsula. What had once been summer cabins became primary residences for people who commuted daily over the bridge to Tacoma. Medium-sized housing development sprang up across the peninsula. The 1980s and 1990s saw substantial retail development near State Route 16 to service the growing residential population, shifting the economic center of Gig Harbor out of downtown. For some time, city leaders were unsure how to handle the growth while maintaining the character of the city. Ultimately, the city decided to aggressively annex the surrounding rural areas and convert them into high-density commercial and housing districts, forever changing the rural character of the area but assuring that little new development happens in the historic downtown area, preserving its history and charm. By the 1970s, local merchants had begun actively promoting the downtown area for its historic value, and tourism became prominent on the list of economic engines in Gig Harbor. Today, downtown Gig Harbor is a very active place for tourists with shopping, dining and recreation on every block. The last large swath of undeveloped waterfront property at the south end of downtown, was recently developed into the headquarters of the Russell Foundation, named for George Russell, founder of Russell Financial.

Today, despite a long history of boat building, very little manufacturing exists in Gig Harbor. The only remaining boatbuilder is Gig Harbor Boatworks, which builds rowing and sailing dinghies in classic style using modern materials. Until recently, Tiderunner Boats maintained a manufacturing facility at the north end of the bay. The historic Skansie boatyard is now primarily a maintenance facility for yachts and pleasure craft. The Glein/Eddon/Gig Harbor boatyard was recently purchased by the city after spending many years sitting idle. The city intends to use it as a working waterfront museum.

Commercial fishing is still of great cultural, if somewhat lesser economic, importance to Gig Harbor, and many commercial fishing boats make it their home port. Most, however, do not rely on Puget Sound to gather their catch, instead finding it more profitable to venture north to Alaska to fish in the summer. Gig Harbor’s fishing fleet still gathers the first weekend in June (during the Maritime Gig Festival) in the center of the bay for the annual Blessing of the Fleet ceremony. In recent years, due to the dwindling number of remaining fishing boats, pleasure craft have been allowed to participate in the ceremony, somewhat lessening its authenticity, but increasing its visibility and participation.

A new Tacoma Narrows Bridge has been built alongside the existing bridge and opened July 2007, doubling past capacity. With it will come new economic challenges and benefits for the city of Gig Harbor and the surrounding community.     ~Wikipedia

Gig Harbor Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gig_Harbor,_Washington

City of Gig Harbor http://www.cityofgigharbor.net/

Cascade provides pest control in Shelton, Belfair and Mason County for rats and mice, ants, spiders, yellow jackets, bees and many other pests. Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment!

Cascade Pest Control & Extermination – Shelton, Belfair and Mason County Washington

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