Rodent and Insect Control in Auburn

Cascade provides pest control in Auburn for carpenter ants, mouse/mice problems, rats, beetles, moths, flies, termites, wasps, spiders, yellow jackets, hornets and most any pest. To get rid of rats, bugs, insects, spiders or other pests and keep them gone, you need an expert exterminator who can do the job quickly, safely, effectively. We’ve been taking care of people’s residences and commercial properties for over 35 years in Auburn and surrounding communities.

We know how to handle the unique challenges of pest control in the Northwest – aggressive rodent infestations, destructive carpenter ants and other insect populations that rise each season. In fact, we’ve become specialists in rodent control, using methods that are family and pet friendly.

Rodent Control Auburn & Vicinity • Ant Control Auburn & Vicinity

Spider and Other Pest Control Auburn & Vicinity • Cascade’s Services – Auburn & Beyond

RODENT CONTROL – Most rodents encountered within the Auburn area are rats, mice and squirrels. Squirrels are a “nuisance wildlife” problem and are dealt with carefully. Rats and mice, however, cause considerable damage and spread filth and disease. Rats commonly nest in home and commercial building insulation causing it to decompress and lose much of its insulation value. The insulation is also contaminated with rat filth, feces and urine. The cost to replace insulation and decontaminate an attic or crawlspace can be high. Rats (and mice too) also gnaw into electrical insulation on wires causing short circuits and even fires. Rats also contaminate stored food and damage stored items and parts of home (roofing, etc) by gnawing holes.

Cascade Pest Control specializes in rat, rodent and mouse control in the city of Auburn. Cascade’s technicians are uniquely trained to detect rodent issues, assess rat infestations and plan control measures to eradicate the rats or mice. More information about Rodent Control.

ANT CONTROL – Ants problems can come in two forms: nuisance ants that plague your kitchen and other areas inside the home, and wood destroying ants, such as carpenter ants. Carpenter ants are very prevalent throughout greater Auburn. They lived here for thousands of years in the original forests. But carpenter ants can easily adapt to the wall cavities of homes and move in, then continue to tunnel into the wood eventually causing significant damage requiring a contractor. Other pest ants found in Auburn are filthy nuisances that roam throughout our homes. These species include the “Odorous House Ant” and others. Learn more about how Cascade protects your home from ants here.

OTHER PESTS – Cascade Pest Control also controls Spiders, Earwigs, Cockroaches, Food Pests, Clothes Moths, Yellow Jackets, Bees, Termites and more.

Call Cascade Pest for your pest control needs in Auburn, at 1-888-989-8979 today.
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Auburn is a city in King County and additionally Pierce CountyWashingtonUnited States; with the majority of spatial land area within King County. The population was 70,180 at the 2010 United States Census. Auburn is a suburb in the Seattle metropolitan area. Auburn is currently ranked the fourteenth largest city in the state of Washington.

Auburn is bordered by the cities of Federal WayPacific, and Algona to the west, Sumner to the south, Kent to the north, and unincorporated King County to the east. The Muckleshoot Indian Reservation is in or near the southern city limits.

Auburn was originally incorporated as Slaughter, Washington after Lt. William Slaughter, who died in a skirmish fighting Native Americans which are now a part of the modern day Muckleshoot tribe in 1855. At the time, the main hotel in town was called the “Slaughter House.” In 1893, a large group of settlers from Auburn, New York, moved to Slaughter, and renamed the town to “Auburn.”  Due to this history, when Auburn was building its second high school in the mid-1990s, there was a grass-roots effort to name the high school “Slaughter High School,” but it was eventually decided that the name would be “Auburn Riverside High School,” whose mascots are the Ravens.

There are several locations in and around Auburn on the National and State Registers of Historic Places including the Neely Mansion.

The city of Auburn, located 28 miles (45 km) south of Seattle, Washington, was home to some of the earliest settlers in King County. Nestled in a fertile river valley, Auburn has been both a farm community and a center of business and industry for more than 150 years. Auburn is located near the original confluence of the Green and White rivers, both of which contain runoff water from the Cascade Mountain range. The valley was originally the home of the Skopamish, Smalhkamish, and Stkamish Indian tribes. The first white men in the region were explorers and traders who arrived in the 1830s.

Settlers first came to the valley in the 1850s. In November, a military unit led by Lieutenant William Slaughter camped near what is now present-day Auburn.

A new treaty was written which provided the establishment of the Muckleshoot reservation, which is the only Indian reservation now within the boundaries of King County. The White River tribes collectively became known as the Muckleshoot tribe.

White settlers, the Neely and Ballard families began returning to the area. In 1891, the town of Slaughter incorporated. Although many older citizens considered the town’s name as a memorial, many newer residents understandably felt uncomfortable with it. Within two years, the town was renamed Auburn, taken from the first line of Oliver Goldsmith’s poem, The Deserted Village: “Sweet Auburn! Loveliest village of the plain.”

Auburn had been a bustling center for hop farming until 1890 when the crops were destroyed by aphids. After that, the farms were mostly dairy farms and berry farms. Nevertheless, flooding was still a problem for Auburn farmers up until the Howard A. Hanson Dam was opened in 1962. This dam on the Green River, along with the Mud Mountain Dam on the White River, provided controlled river management, which left the valley nearly flood-free and opened up the rich bottom lands for industrial development.

Another impetus to Auburn’s growth was the railroad. The Northern Pacific Railway‘s subsidiary the Northern Pacific and Puget Sound Shore Railroad opened a line from approximately Puyallup, Washington, through to Seattle, Washington, in 1882. The Seattle-Tacoma Interurban line that allowed easy access to both cities starting in 1902. The railroad, along with better roads, caused many new companies to set up business in Auburn, among them the Borden Condensery (which made Borden’s Condensed Milk) and the Northern Clay Company.

Through the twentieth century Auburn grew like many American towns. Many young men went off to fight in the First World War, which was followed by the great influenza epidemic. The 1920s were prosperous for citizens, but the Great Depression of the 1930s left many in need. World War II brought great hardship to many local Japanese-American farmers when they were moved to internment camps and their land taken from them. At the same time, local boys were sent to fight in the Pacific, North Africa, and Europe. Many were wounded and some died in battle.

The post-war era was prosperous to Auburn, bringing more businesses and a community college to the city. In 1963, the Boeing Company built a large facility to mill sheet metal skin for jet airliners. As time went on, many farms disappeared as the land was converted to industrial use. In 1995, The Super-Mall of the Great Northwest was built in the valley, bringing in consumers from all over the Puget Sound region.

Much of the city’s transition from agricultural small town to industrial and suburban development remains. A monument in the memory of Lieutenant Slaughter, erected in 1918, still stands in a local park. The Neely Mansion, built by the son of a pioneer in 1891, has been refurbished and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Auburn’s downtown still maintains a “Main Street U.S.A.” appearance.

In 2008, Auburn nearly doubled its population by annexing the West Hill and Lea Hill neighborhood of unincorporated King County.

Links Relating to Auburn, WA.

City of Auburn Rat & Rodent Control & Prevention: http://www.auburnwa.gov/Assets/PCD/AuburnWA/Docs/Code+Compliance/Rats$!2c+Mice+and+Rodents.pdf

Wikipedia for Auburn, WA – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auburn,_Washington

City of Auburn – http://www.auburnwa.gov/home.htm

History of Auburn – http://www.auburnwa.gov/about/history.htm

White River Valley Museum – http://wrvmuseum.pastperfectonline.com/

City of Auburn Twitter – https://twitter.com/auburn_wa?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

Cascade provides pest control in Auburn for rats and mice, ants, spiders, yellow jackets, bees and many other pests. Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment!

Cascade Pest Control & Extermination – Auburn Washington

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