Rodent and Insect Control in Mukilteo

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Cascade provides pest control in Mukilteo for carpenter ants, mouse/mice problems, rats, beetles, moths, flies, termites, wasps, spiders, yellow jackets, hornets and most any pest. To get rid of rats, bugs, insects, spiders or other pests and keep them gone, you need an expert exterminator who can do the job quickly, safely, effectively. We’ve been taking care of people’s residences and commercial properties for over 35 years in Mukilteo and surrounding communities.

We know how to handle the unique challenges of pest control in the Northwest – aggressive rodent infestations, destructive carpenter ants and other insect populations that rise each season. In fact, we’ve become specialists in rodent control, using methods that are family and pet friendly.

Rodent Control Mukilteo & Vicinity • Ant Control Mukilteo & Vicinity

Spider and Other Pest Control Muktileo & Vicinity • Cascade’s Services – Mukilteo & Beyond

RODENT CONTROL – Most rodents encountered within the Mukilteo area are rats, mice and squirrels. Squirrels are a “nuisance wildlife” problem and are dealt with carefully. Rats and mice, however, cause considerable damage and spread filth and disease. Rats commonly nest in home and commercial building insulation causing it to decompress and lose much of its insulation value. The insulation is also contaminated with rat filth, feces and urine. The cost to replace insulation and decontaminate an attic or crawlspace can be high. Rats (and mice too) also gnaw into electrical insulation on wires causing short circuits and even fires. Rats also contaminate stored food and damage stored items and parts of home (roofing, etc) by gnawing holes.

Cascade Pest Control specializes in rat, rodent and mouse control in the city of Mukilteo. Cascade’s technicians are uniquely trained to detect rodent issues, assess rat infestations and plan control measures to eradicate the rats or mice. More information about Rodent Control.

ANT CONTROL – Ants problems can come in two forms: nuisance ants that plague your kitchen and other areas inside the home, and wood destroying ants, such as carpenter ants. Carpenter ants are very prevalent throughout Mukilteo and surrounding area. They lived here for thousands of years in the original forests. But carpenter ants can easily adapt to the wall cavities of homes and move in, then continue to tunnel into the wood eventually causing significant damage requiring a contractor. Other pest ants found in Mukilteo are filthy nuisances that roam throughout our homes. These species include the “Odorous House Ant” and others. Learn more about how Cascade protects your home from ants here.

OTHER PESTS – Cascade Pest Control also controls Spiders, Earwigs, Cockroaches, Food Pests, Clothes Moths, Yellow Jackets, Bees, Termites and more.

Call Cascade Pest for your pest control needs in Mukilteo,
at 425-641-6264 or 1-888-989-8979 today.
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The City of Mukilteo – Information and History

Mukilteo (/ˌmʌkəlˈt/ US dict: mŭk′·əl·tē′·ō), which means “good camping ground,” is a city in Snohomish County, Washington, United States. The population was 20,254 at the 2010 census. It is on the shore of the Puget Sound, and is the site of a Washington State Ferries terminal linking it to Clinton, on Whidbey Island. Mukilteo is one of the most affluent suburbs of Seattle. ~Wikipedia

Mukilteo (/ˌmʌkəlˈtiːoʊ/ US dict: mŭk′·əl·tē′·ō), which means “good camping ground,” is a city in Snohomish County, Washington, United States. The population was 20,254 at the 2010 census. It is on the shore of the Puget Sound, and is the site of a Washington State Ferries terminal linking it to Clinton, on Whidbey Island.

Mukilteo is one of the most affluent suburbs of Seattle. In 2007, the city had a median income of $83,569. Additionally, like the rest of the Seattle area, house prices have risen rapidly; the median value in 2007 was $567,000. Based on per capita income, Mukilteo ranks 29th of 522 areas in the state of Washington. The city is also home to one of the most expensive high schools ever built in America, Kamiak High School. In 2009, Mukilteo was ranked as number 10 of Money Magazine’s top 100 small towns of America to live in. In 2011, Mukilteo rose one rank to number 9.

Though the word Mukilteo is widely believed to mean “good camping site,” the HistoryLink.org site notes that in the Snohomish dialect Muk-wil-teo means “narrow passage,” a reference to the sand spit that formed the original Mukilteo landing. Mukilteo was officially incorporated on May 8, 1947, but the city has a historic role in the development of the Puget Sound. It was at Mukilteo that the Point Elliott Treaty was signed between Governor Isaac Stevens and the chiefs of 22 Puget Sound tribes on January 22, 1855.

The treaty ceded land to the United States from Point Pully (now called Three Tree Point south of Seattle) to the British (Canadian) border in exchange for a variety of benefits, including land, education, health care and hunting and fishing rights. The treaty was signed before more than 2,500 Native Americans.

According to the Mukilteo Historical Society, the town became the first settled by Europeans in 1858 and was the county seat of Snohomish County from 1861 when Snohomish County was created from Island County to 1867, when the city of Snohomish became the county seat. Initially the settlement was called Point Elliott, the name given the location by the Wilkes Expedition in 1841.

In its early years, Mukilteo was a fishing village, trading post, and a port-of-entry. Surrounding wooded hills filled with Douglas fir, cedar and hemlock supported a lumber mill and the town also had a cannery, a brewery, and a gunpowder plant. Traces of the powder mill remain in the name of Powder Mill Gulch, a ravine that is located about one mile (1.6 km) into the city limits of Everett. Japanese Gulch provides rail access from the Mukilteo waterfront to the Boeing’s Boeing Everett Factory at Paine Field.

In 1900, the population was only 350. The next year, the federal Lighthouse Board decided to put a light and fog signal at the point in Mukilteo. The lighthouse, which still stands today, was completed in 1906.

Even at incorporation in 1947, almost a century after the Point Elliott Treaty, Mukilteo’s population stood at only 775. But by 1947, there was ferry service to Whidbey Island, a fuel storage facility for the Air Force on the waterfront, and a major rail line for the Great Northern Railway along the city’s entire waterfront.

The first growth spurt for the city came with the 1980 annexation of an additional 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2) to the south along the Mukilteo Speedway or SR 525, which increased the population to 4,130 people. In 1991, the Harbour Pointe area was annexed, doubling the size of the city to 6.25 square miles (16.19 km2). The annexation increased the city’s population to just over 10,000 and also presaged a shift from the Old Town commercial center near the ferry to new shopping and banking facilities at Harbour Pointe. With development since the Harbour Pointe annexation, the city’s population has reached 19,360 (2005). The city has agreed to an urban growth area that includes approximately 15,000 additional potential residents.

The major parkland in the city is the former state park and lighthouse, next to the ferry docks. In 1954, the state acquired 17 acres (69,000 m2) of land around the lighthouse and made it into a state park, including a popular boat ramp. In 2003, the state faced a budgetary crisis and offered to cede the park to the city, which the city accepted. The city renamed the park Mukilteo Lighthouse Park and has plans for redevelopment that may ultimately spend $6 million for new facilities.

Substantial development is expected along the waterfront in the next five to ten years, with the state planning to build a new ferry terminal east of the current location. The Mukilteo-Clinton ferry provides service for 3 million passengers per year with two ferries currently serving the run.

In 1992, the government of Mukilteo opposed plans to expand Paine Field; Mayor Brian Sullivan said that the city disagrees “with the idea of a Sea-Tac north” and supports upholding a 1978 agreement between residents around Paine Field and Snohomish County.

The transportation hub will use some of the land being turned over by the federal government on the site of the old fuel docks. Included is an $18 million terminal for Sounder commuter rail service, scheduled to open in June, 2008 on the Everett-Seattle line. In addition, the city and Port of Everett are working to redevelop the remaining land on the tank farm property for private and public use. ~ Wikipedia

Relevant Links for Mukilteo, WA:

City website: http://www.ci.mukilteo.wa.us/index.asp

Beekeeping within city limits: http://mukilteobeacon.villagesoup.com/p/council-ok-to-keep-bees-in-city/804802

Nuisance properties and rats: http://www.ci.mukilteo.wa.us/News.asp?NewsID=178

Cascade provides pest control in Mukilteo for rats and mice, ants, spiders, yellow jackets, bees and many other pests. Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment!

Cascade Pest Control & Extermination – Mukilteo Washington

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