Rodent and Insect Control in Edmonds / Mountlake Terrace

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 Rodents – Rats/Mice
Termite Protection
Nuisance Wildlife
 Ant Control
Wasps/Bees
Rodent-Proofing
 Spider Control
Other Insects, etc.
Dead Rat Removal/Odor Control

Cascade Pest Control/Exterminators – Cascade has been providing insect & rodent control & protection since 1979. Cascade is local & family-owned.   The Cascade team is dedicated to provide safe & effective pest management solutions and great customer care. Cascade has earned a reputation for respecting the natural environment and your health and safety. Cascade provides Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

rodents, rats, miceRodents – Rats & Mice.   Cascade Pest Control specializes in rodent control, extermination, removal & elimination.   Here in the northwest rodent problems are predominantly the Norway Rat (a.k.a. the brown Rat, sewer Rat & wharf Rat); the Roof Rat (a.k.a the black rat or ship rat); House Mouse; and wild mice, such as the Deer mouse and the Field or Meadow mouse. In most cases by the time we are called there is already an established rat or mouse infestation. Both rats and mice spread disease, however, the deer mouse is a common carrier of hantavirus.   Rat/rodent damage occurs to insulation (in attics & crawlspaces), they gnaw on wires causing shorts and even fires, and they contaminate areas they traverse and nest. Rats & mice take advantage of home construction seeking shelter, nesting material (usually home insulation), and food (leftover dog & cat food, spilt bird seed and more.) Cascade Pest Control provides rat/mice/rodent inspections & assessments, rat/rodent abatement, rodent exclusion (rat- and mouse-proofing or blocking), rodent protection and damage repair. Most rodent damage results in compressed, disrupted or contaminated insulation. Cascade can also help with the “dirty job” of removing dead rats, rodents or other animal carcasses and smell/odor control.   Cascade is also available for rat/rodent abatement—a process of rodent population containment when large structures are cleared for a new construction project.


ant control

Ant Control.   In the greater Puget Sound Region we encounter a number of ant pests, some of which are extremely persistent and annoying, and others cause damage to wood timbers. The most prevalent ants are odorous house ants (insidious tiny black ants), carpenter ants (moderate to large black ants that nest in and damage wood structures), pavement ants, thatching ants (often build stack of fir/pine needles or dried grass), and moisture ants (nest in very wet or decaying wood). There are also other ant species that have been brought into the area which cause some nasty problems (pharaoh ants and other species).
Cascade provides ant pest control (a.k.a. ant extermination, ant removal, ant elimination, ant fumigation, ant eradication). Ant control measures vary widely depending on the species—some primarily rely on special baiting techniques and other, such as carpenter ants, may require injecting wall voids.


spiderSpider Control. Spiders are creepy, cause messy & unsightly webs, and some can inflict harmful bites. Although most all spiders carry some form of venom, few can penetrate human skin to cause any harm. One local species is particularly poisonous, the hobo spider which is also known as the “aggressive house spider” can cause lesions and other symptoms. Black widow spiders are plentiful in eastern Washington but rare in the Puget sound region. Brown recluse spiders—also famous for poisonous bites—are not found in the northwest.   It should be noted, however, that it is possible for these spiders to be carried when moving (furniture & other items) from another part of the country. Much of our spider problems result from webs that obscure windows and other locations, how they creep through a home, and some smaller bites.


termite controlTermites. We have the largest species of termite in the United States here in the northwest. Fortunately, the Dampwood termite only nests in very wet or decaying wood and seldom damages homes. However, we do have the famously destructive termite—the subterranean termite—in various locations throughout the region. These locations are more or less dependent on local soil types. Localities where subterranean termites are most prevalent are West Seattle, areas near Issaquah, various parts of south King county and further south (Pierce & Thurston counties). Other areas occasionally encounter them.
Cascade provides termite control measures (a.k.a. termite treatments, extermination, removal, fumigation & protection.)


wasp, bee, hornet controlWasps & Bees. Wasps are threatening in their aggressive behavior and the very painful stings they inflict. These stings can be particularly threatening to anyone with compromised health issues or who are allergic to the stings.   The most troublesome wasps locally are yellow jackets and bald-faced hornets (actually a variety of yellow jacket). They can nest in wall voids, beneath porches, in ground nests, or nests that hang from roof eaves or tree and bush branches. Yellow jackets are aggressive and nests build up to large numbers—up to 4 or 5 thousand. When nesting above a ceiling or behind a wall they can scratch their way through sheetrock causing a sudden intrusion of many wasps within a home’s living space.
There are also a few a-social wasps which, while menacing-looking, are usually not a problem unless nesting close to a doorway or other place people frequent.
Bees are not normally considered a pest and are valuable pollinators (as are other insects, including butterflies and certain wasps, flies, & beetles.) However, occasionally bees will nest where they cannot be avoided and cannot be moved causing a health-threat, both directly by stings and because some people are highly allergic. Fortunately, this is fairly rare.
Cascade provides wasp, yellow jacket & hornet control (a.k.a. wasp/bee/yellow jacket extermination, elimination, eradication, fumigation & removal.) When treating a wasp nest it is normally important to leave it in place so all foraging wasps will return to the nest and die.   Your Cascade technician can watch for early signs of wasp nest building and/or provide effective control and protection.


cockroach controlOther pests. Here is a partial list of the many other pest issues that we face here in the Puget Sound region:
Bed bugs.
Fabric pests—Carpet beetles and clothes moths.
Food pests (“pantry pests”)—carpet beetles, Indian meal moth, ‘drug store’ beetles.
Nuisance insects—cockroaches, flies, silverfish, cluster flies, overwintering lady-beetles.
Occasional pests—millipedes, centipedes, sow & pill bugs, earwigs.
Wood boring beetles.

Click here to access the Cascade pest library


squirral controlNuisance Wildlife. Occasionally, wildlife animals such as squirrels, raccoons, opossums, birds or other animals nest in and make a mess of our attics, crawlspaces or other locations. These animals are best not killed, but trapped or pushed out. Cascade provides nuisance animal exclusion meaning that they blocked from further entry. Cascade also provides remedial work to clean up filth and contamination, odor problems, and damage—particularly to insulation—that is caused by these creatures.


Exclusion. Closing gaps, cracks and holes that allow rodents and other pest into attics, crawlspaces, wall voids and more is referred to as rodent/rat/mouse exclusion or pest exclusion. It is also called rodent/rat-proofing or pest-proofing or pest “build-out” or pest-blocking.
Homes and other structures are often built with gaps that allow pest entry. Also, wooden siding and some roofing materials are soft enough for rats to gnaw their way in.
Cascade has specialized pest control technicians who have a variety of ways to keep rodents from entering structures, whether tunneling or gnawing their way in. Also, insect pests can be blocked or excluded by sealing small cracks & crevices.   This greatly slows down pest infestations and helps with control.


Dead Rodent/Animal Removal & Odor Control. Unfortunately, rodents and other animals die in attics, wall voids or crawlspaces and create a horrible odor/smell as well as a biohazard. We encounter dead mice; rats; other rodents such as squirrels, raccoons, opossum and birds. It’s mess and a dirty job but your Cascade technician has the equipment to remove the dead animal and its proper disposal. Removing the carcass alone drastically reduces the odor, however, other measures may be called for, both for odor reduction and sanitation (decontamination).

Contact us today to protect your home from rat, rodents, ants & other pests : 1(888) 989-8979.

The City of Edmonds – Information and History

Edmonds is a city in Snohomish County, Washington, United States, 11 miles (18 km) north of Seattle, Washington. Edmonds has a view of Puget Sound and both the Olympic Mountains and Cascade Range. The third most populous city in Snohomish County after Everett and Marysville, the population was 39,709 according to the 2010 census. Based on per capita income, one of the more reliable measures of affluence, Edmonds ranks 37th of 522 areas in the state of Washington to be ranked. ~ Wikipedia

Edmonds is a city in Snohomish County, Washington, United States, 11 miles (18 km) north of Seattle, Washington. Edmonds has a view of Puget Sound and both the Olympic Mountains and Cascade Range. The third most populous city in Snohomish County after Everett and Marysville, the population was 39,709 according to the 2010 census. Based on per capita income, one of the more reliable measures of affluence, Edmonds ranks 37th of 522 areas in the state of Washington to be ranked.

Edmonds is a port in the Washington State Ferries system. Currently, the only ferry from Edmonds is a run to Kingston, Washington; in the past, there have been much longer routes from Edmonds to Port Townsend, Washington.

History

Edmonds is the oldest incorporated city in Snohomish County. Logger George Brackett founded Edmonds in 1890, naming the city either for Vermont Sen. George Franklin Edmunds or in association with the nearby Point Edmund, named by Charles Wilkes in 1841 and later changed to Point Edwards. Brackett came to the future site of Edmonds while paddling a canoe north of Seattle, searching for timber. When a gust of wind hit his canoe, Brackett beached in a location later called “Brackett’s Landing”.

The town was named Edmonds in 1884, but was not incorporated until 1890 as an official “village fourth class” of Snohomish County. In that same year, Brackett sold 455 acres (1.84 km2) to the Minneapolis Realty and Investment Company. The town was plotted and a wharf was added along the waterfront. Modest houses and commercial structures sprouted up with a row of shingle mills dominating the cityscape.

In 1891, the Great Northern Railway came through and early settlers and investors grew hopeful that Edmonds would prosper. Unfortunately, the Panic of 1893 created business setbacks and the town owners foreclosed. Brackett reclaimed his town and along with other early settlers continued to develop its infrastructure. By 1900 there was regular passenger ferry service available by the steam-powered “mosquito fleet” of private ferryboats from Edmonds to Seattle.

Edmonds suffered major fires in 1909 and 1928, and many buildings were lost. The first car arrived in Edmonds in 1911. As more roads were established, Edmonds experienced steady growth along with commercial and residential development.

Historic sites

The Edmonds South Snohomish Historical Society resides in the city’s only National Historic Place – the old Carnegie Library of Edmonds. Located on 5th Ave, it was built in 1910 to serve as a library and education building, and opened to the public February 17, 1911. It now serves as the Edmonds Historical Museum.

The Edmonds Fountain/Gazebo

The Edmonds Fountain, a local landmark, has been a major source of contention over the past decades. The current Edmonds Fountain is located in the center of the intersection of 5th Avenue and Main St. Until 1970, every holiday season the Edmonds municipal Christmas tree stood on this spot. In 1970 the original fountain, an obscure twisted sculpture incorporating water elements, was erected. Often the target of high school pranks (such as adding soap so that bubbles poured from the fountain onto the street) and other local humor, that fountain and sculpture were wrecked in 1998 by a drunk driver. The city council and subsequent “Gazebo” subcommittee decided to build a new structure and a wooden gazebo was constructed a year later. In 2005, a driver crashed into it at night and the gazebo met the same fate as the earlier fountain. After a long discussion over whether to replace the gazebo or landscape the center of the roundabout, a decision was made to rebuild the gazebo/fountain, this time with steel rods extending from the main pillars deep underground. It was completed in the summer of 2006.

Related links for Edmonds, WA

 http://www.edmondswa.gov/spring-2014/1900-take-care-of-your-yard-naturally.html

Edmonds Park Maintenance reduces pesticide use: http://www.edmondswa.gov/update-on-edmonds/452-services/sustainability-a-environment/sound-future-sustainability/sustainability-initiatives-tabs/1459-greening-park-maintenance-project.html

Recommendations for streamside landowners: http://www.edmondswa.gov/website-maintenance/public-works-articles/113-streamside-landowners.html

Mountlake Terrace is a city in Snohomish CountyWashingtonUnited States. It is a northern suburb of Seattle and lies north of Shoreline and Lake Forest Park, east of Edmonds, south of Lynnwood, and west of Brier. Its southern boundary runs along the King County line. Interstate 5 runs north-south through the city, and services the city via three exits. The population was 19,909 at the 2010 census.

History The site of Mountlake Terrace was thickly forested in the mid-Nineteenth Century and formed part of the traditional hunting-gathering areas of the Snohomish people. The area was obtained by the Puget Mill Company in 1862. By 1900, most of the land in south Snohomish County had been logged. Pope & Talbot Company, the successor entity of the Puget Mill Company, subdivided the cut area into 10-acre plots, which were sold as “chicken ranches.” These plots were sold with moderate success to ranchers raising poultry, mink, and chinchilla. An interurban rail line between Tacoma, Washington and Everett, Washington was built in 1910, allowing easier access to the farms from throughout the region. Many of them failed during the Great Depression, however, and the railroad was abandoned in 1939.

A portion of the area was used by the United States government during World War II as a landing field. At the end of the war, the government ceased operation of the airfield. In 1949, developers Albert LaPierre and Jack Peterson. bought the abandoned airstrip and began constructing cinder-block houses. They named their development “Mountlake Terrace” because from some parts of the property they could see both Mount Rainier and Lake Washington, and the old runway looked a little like a terrace.

Incorporation In 1954, over 5,000 people lived in the area between 244th and 216th Streets SW, and 48th and 68th Avenues W. The existing infrastructure was overwhelmed by this unplanned growth. Some people waited a year for a party-line telephone, streets were unpaved, and household sanitation was provided by individual septic systems. The nearest police department was in Everett, 15 miles away. One resident, Patrick McMahan, became frustrated by these conditions, and organized the Mountlake Terrace Study Committee, which led a campaign to incorporate the community. The election held November 23, 1954 supported incorporation, 517 to 483. Voters chose a five-person city council in the same election. The council had its first meeting on November 24 and selected Gilbert “Gil” Geiser, a 35-year-old hardware store owner, as Mountlake Terrace’s first mayor. Geiser had to lend the new city $5 so the incorporation papers could be filed. With the filing, on November 29, Mountlake Terrace officially became a third-class city.

Early growth Mountlake Terrace’s population doubled between 1950 and 1960 and then nearly doubled again by 1970. Small businesses flourished in two strip-mall-type shopping centers in the middle of the area, on land provided by the developers. The developers also donated land for several churches, including the parish of St. Pius X, which celebrated its first mass on June 22, 1955. The John Fluke Corporation moved its electronics center from Seattle to Mountlake Terrace in 1959. In 1961 a bond issue was approved in a special election; it was used to build a City Hall.

Slowing of development The city had been first envisioned as an automobile-based bedroom community, but subsequent leaders began to envision it as a “stand-alone” development with an economically vital downtown area. This effort was aided by the arrival of Fluke and the construction of the two strip malls and the City Hall. However, this development halted in the 1980s.  Boeing suffered a significant business downturn, in which about 75% of plant workers in Everett lost their jobs; Alderwood Mall was opened in Lynnwood which drew much of the area’s business away from downtown; and in 1990 two arson fires in the city center caused significant destruction. In 1981, Fluke moved its facility to Everett. The 1980 census showed that Mountlake Terrace’s population had dropped by almost 5 percent in 10 years. The city budget was repeatedly trimmed, but Mountlake Terrace entered 1989 with a $1.3 million deficit.

Recent history

Intersection of 236th St SW and 56th Ave W in downtown Mountlake Terrace.

The mid-2000s saw new construction on 56th Avenue, and in 2006 the city created a plan to revitalize the downtown area and encourage economic activity.[5][6][c] As of 2013 the town’s largest employer was Premera Blue Cross, which employs some 3,000 people.

A city-center plan adopted in February 2007 allows mixed-use buildings of up to seven stories in the central block and up to five stories in surrounding blocks. The previous limit was three stories.   ~Wikipedia

City of Mountlake Terrace http://www.cityofmlt.com/

Wikipedia – Mountlake Terrace https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountlake_Terrace,_Washington

Cascade provides pest control in Edmonds and Mountlake Terrace for rats and mice, ants, spiders, yellow jackets, bees and many other pests. Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment!

Cascade Pest Control & Extermination – Edmonds and Mountlake Terrace Washington

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