Rodent and Insect Control in Burien

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Contact us today to protect your home from rat, rodents, ants & other pests

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 Rodents – Rats/Mice
Termite Protection
Nuisance Wildlife
 Ant Control
Wasps/Bees
Rodent-Proofing
 Spider Control
Other Insects, etc.
Dead Rat Removal/Odor Control

Cascade Pest Control/Exterminators – Cascade has been providing insect & rodent control & protection since 1979. Cascade is local & family-owned.   The Cascade team is dedicated to provide safe & effective pest management solutions and great customer care. Cascade has earned a reputation for respecting the natural environment and your health and safety. Cascade provides Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

rodents, rats, miceRodents – Rats & Mice.   Cascade Pest Control specializes in rodent control, extermination, removal & elimination.   Here in the northwest rodent problems are predominantly the Norway Rat (a.k.a. the brown Rat, sewer Rat & wharf Rat); the Roof Rat (a.k.a the black rat or ship rat); House Mouse; and wild mice, such as the Deer mouse and the Field or Meadow mouse. In most cases by the time we are called there is already an established rat or mouse infestation. Both rats and mice spread disease, however, the deer mouse is a common carrier of hantavirus.   Rat/rodent damage occurs to insulation (in attics & crawlspaces), they gnaw on wires causing shorts and even fires, and they contaminate areas they traverse and nest. Rats & mice take advantage of home construction seeking shelter, nesting material (usually home insulation), and food (leftover dog & cat food, spilt bird seed and more.) Cascade Pest Control provides rat/mice/rodent inspections & assessments, rat/rodent abatement, rodent exclusion (rat- and mouse-proofing or blocking), rodent protection and damage repair. Most rodent damage results in compressed, disrupted or contaminated insulation. Cascade can also help with the “dirty job” of removing dead rats, rodents or other animal carcasses and smell/odor control.   Cascade is also available for rat/rodent abatement—a process of rodent population containment when large structures are cleared for a new construction project.


ant control

Ant Control.   In the greater Puget Sound Region we encounter a number of ant pests, some of which are extremely persistent and annoying, and others cause damage to wood timbers. The most prevalent ants are odorous house ants (insidious tiny black ants), carpenter ants (moderate to large black ants that nest in and damage wood structures), pavement ants, thatching ants (often build stack of fir/pine needles or dried grass), and moisture ants (nest in very wet or decaying wood). There are also other ant species that have been brought into the area which cause some nasty problems (pharaoh ants and other species).
Cascade provides ant pest control (a.k.a. ant extermination, ant removal, ant elimination, ant fumigation, ant eradication). Ant control measures vary widely depending on the species—some primarily rely on special baiting techniques and other, such as carpenter ants, may require injecting wall voids.


spiderSpider Control. Spiders are creepy, cause messy & unsightly webs, and some can inflict harmful bites. Although most all spiders carry some form of venom, few can penetrate human skin to cause any harm. One local species is particularly poisonous, the hobo spider which is also known as the “aggressive house spider” can cause lesions and other symptoms. Black widow spiders are plentiful in eastern Washington but rare in the Puget sound region. Brown recluse spiders—also famous for poisonous bites—are not found in the northwest.   It should be noted, however, that it is possible for these spiders to be carried when moving (furniture & other items) from another part of the country. Much of our spider problems result from webs that obscure windows and other locations, how they creep through a home, and some smaller bites.


termite controlTermites. We have the largest species of termite in the United States here in the northwest. Fortunately, the Dampwood termite only nests in very wet or decaying wood and seldom damages homes. However, we do have the famously destructive termite—the subterranean termite—in various locations throughout the region. These locations are more or less dependent on local soil types. Localities where subterranean termites are most prevalent are West Seattle, areas near Issaquah, various parts of south King county and further south (Pierce & Thurston counties). Other areas occasionally encounter them.
Cascade provides termite control measures (a.k.a. termite treatments, extermination, removal, fumigation & protection.)


wasp, bee, hornet controlWasps & Bees. Wasps are threatening in their aggressive behavior and the very painful stings they inflict. These stings can be particularly threatening to anyone with compromised health issues or who are allergic to the stings.   The most troublesome wasps locally are yellow jackets and bald-faced hornets (actually a variety of yellow jacket). They can nest in wall voids, beneath porches, in ground nests, or nests that hang from roof eaves or tree and bush branches. Yellow jackets are aggressive and nests build up to large numbers—up to 4 or 5 thousand. When nesting above a ceiling or behind a wall they can scratch their way through sheetrock causing a sudden intrusion of many wasps within a home’s living space.
There are also a few a-social wasps which, while menacing-looking, are usually not a problem unless nesting close to a doorway or other place people frequent.
Bees are not normally considered a pest and are valuable pollinators (as are other insects, including butterflies and certain wasps, flies, & beetles.) However, occasionally bees will nest where they cannot be avoided and cannot be moved causing a health-threat, both directly by stings and because some people are highly allergic. Fortunately, this is fairly rare.
Cascade provides wasp, yellow jacket & hornet control (a.k.a. wasp/bee/yellow jacket extermination, elimination, eradication, fumigation & removal.) When treating a wasp nest it is normally important to leave it in place so all foraging wasps will return to the nest and die.   Your Cascade technician can watch for early signs of wasp nest building and/or provide effective control and protection.


cockroach controlOther pests. Here is a partial list of the many other pest issues that we face here in the Puget Sound region:
Bed bugs.
Fabric pests—Carpet beetles and clothes moths.
Food pests (“pantry pests”)—carpet beetles, Indian meal moth, ‘drug store’ beetles.
Nuisance insects—cockroaches, flies, silverfish, cluster flies, overwintering lady-beetles.
Occasional pests—millipedes, centipedes, sow & pill bugs, earwigs.
Wood boring beetles.

Click here to access the Cascade pest library


squirral controlNuisance Wildlife. Occasionally, wildlife animals such as squirrels, raccoons, opossums, birds or other animals nest in and make a mess of our attics, crawlspaces or other locations. These animals are best not killed, but trapped or pushed out. Cascade provides nuisance animal exclusion meaning that they blocked from further entry. Cascade also provides remedial work to clean up filth and contamination, odor problems, and damage—particularly to insulation—that is caused by these creatures.


Exclusion. Closing gaps, cracks and holes that allow rodents and other pest into attics, crawlspaces, wall voids and more is referred to as rodent/rat/mouse exclusion or pest exclusion. It is also called rodent/rat-proofing or pest-proofing or pest “build-out” or pest-blocking.
Homes and other structures are often built with gaps that allow pest entry. Also, wooden siding and some roofing materials are soft enough for rats to gnaw their way in.
Cascade has specialized pest control technicians who have a variety of ways to keep rodents from entering structures, whether tunneling or gnawing their way in. Also, insect pests can be blocked or excluded by sealing small cracks & crevices.   This greatly slows down pest infestations and helps with control.


Dead Rodent/Animal Removal & Odor Control. Unfortunately, rodents and other animals die in attics, wall voids or crawlspaces and create a horrible odor/smell as well as a biohazard. We encounter dead mice; rats; other rodents such as squirrels, raccoons, opossum and birds. It’s mess and a dirty job but your Cascade technician has the equipment to remove the dead animal and its proper disposal. Removing the carcass alone drastically reduces the odor, however, other measures may be called for, both for odor reduction and sanitation (decontamination).

Contact us today to protect your home from rat, rodents, ants & other pests : 1(888) 989-8979.

 

The City of Burien – Information and History

Burien (/ˈbjʊəriən/ BYUR-ee-ən) is a suburban city in King County, Washington, United States, located south of Seattle. As of the 2010 Census, Burien’s population was 33,313, which is a 49.7% increase since incorporation. An annexation in 2010 increased the city’s population to about 50,000. ~Wikipedia

Burien (/ˈbjʊəriən/ BYUR-ee-ən) is a suburban city in King County, Washington, United States, located south of Seattle. As of the 2010 Census, Burien’s population was 33,313, which is a 49.7% increase since incorporation. An annexation in 2010 increased the city’s population to about 50,000.

Settlement in the Burien area dates to 1864, when George Ouellet (1831–1899), a French-Canadian born in Sainte-Marie-de-Beauce, Quebec, purchased his first of several land patents for homestead sites directly from a Federal land office. Ouellet had first arrived in the Washington Territory at Port Madison on Bainbridge Island, off of the Kitsap Peninsula, in 1858. Three years after purchasing his homestead in the Burien area, he married 14 year-old Elizabeth Cushner, who was born in the Washington Territory, and started a family. Several years later, the Ouellet family moved to the White River Valley, near Auburn.

A popular local tale recounts that an early settler named Mike Kelly gave the community its first name after he emerged from the trees and said, “This is truly a sunny dale.” Today, a few long-time residents still refer to the Burien area as Sunnydale. In 1884, Gottlieb Burian (1837–1902) and his wife Emma (Wurm) Burian (1840–1905), German immigrants from Hussinetz, Lower Silesia, who owned two taverns in downtown Seattle, arrived in Sunnydale. The tiny community was without improved roads or commercial buildings, reached primarily by trails. Burian built a cabin on the southeast corner of Lake Burien and reportedly formed the community into a town bearing his name (misspelled over the years). A real estate office was built and soon attracted large numbers of new residents to Burien. In the early 1900s, visitors from Seattle came by the Mosquito Fleet to Three Tree Point, just west of town to sunbathe and swim.

In 1915, the Lake Burien Railway was completed. It ran on what is today Ambaum Boulevard from Burien to White Center to Seattle. A small passenger train ran the tracks and was affectionately named by the residents, The Toonerville Trolley. However in the summer, squished caterpillars made the track slippery, and in the winter, the tracks iced over. Soon the Toonerville Trolley was removed.

Incorporation

Several proposals to incorporate the greater Burien area, an unincorporated portion of King County, were attempted but failed. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, citizens felt they needed a more responsive government to help address the looming threat of the Port of Seattle’s airport runway expansion (known as the “Third Runway”) to the west, so an effort was again made to incorporate as a city. Citizens also felt that multi-family apartments and dwellings had proliferated out of control in Burien and other unincorporated areas of King County, and that they had no local voice in government, other than the King County Council, that would hear their concerns. The City of Burien was finally incorporated on February 28, 1993 after voter approval.

Annexation

Late in 2004, the City assessed the possibility of annexing North Highline (which includes White Center and Boulevard Park), “one of the largest urban unincorporated areas of King County,” which would double the size of Burien. Many citizens spoke against the annexation and created picket signs and petitions to protest against it. Other citizens welcomed the expansion, as they felt parts of the so-called “North Highline” area should have been part of the original Burien incorporation, and the area in question is part of the larger Highline area. (The Highline area includes the cities of Burien, Seatac, Des Moines, Federal Way and an unincorporated area called “North Highline.”)

In May 2008, the Burien City Council proposed an annexation of the southern portion of North Highline, comprising 14,000 residents. In late summer of 2008, the City of Burien prepared to submit their annexation proposal to King County’s Boundary Review Board. However after the City of Seattle protested Burien’s proposal, Burien opted to withdraw their annexation plan and resubmit it after new countywide planning policies went into effect.

In October 2008, the Burien City Council voted to resubmit their annexation plan to the county Boundary Review Board. However, the cities of Burien and Seattle, along with King County and other stakeholders, first participated and completed mediation to ensure the interests of all parties involved were met. Affected stakeholders would have agreed to a preliminary annexation framework that stipulated how annexation would play-out between the cities of Burien and Seattle and with King County. However, the Seattle City Council voted against the agreement that February. It is not known if Seattle has any future plans for annexation of any part of the North Highline area.

On April 16, 2009, the Boundary Review Board of King County approved Burien’s proposal for annexation of the southern portion of the North Highline area. In early May 2009, both King County and the City of Burien passed resolutions to place an annexation vote on the August 18th primary ballot. The annexation area voted on consisted of southern North Highline and had an area of about 1,600 acres (6.5 km2) and approximately 14,000 citizens. The ballot issue was approved by a majority of southern North Highline residents, and on April 1, 2010, southern North Highline became part of Burien.

After the annexation vote, a special census was conducted, and it was determined that the newly annexed area had 14,292 residents. This resulted in a new population total of 49,858, making Burien the 23rd largest city in Washington State. The Boundary Review Board approved a second proposal for Burien to annex northern North Highline (also known as Area Y) in February 2012, but this was rejected by Area Y residents in November 2012.

Relevant Links regarding the City of Burien:

City Website: http://www.burienwa.gov/index.aspx

Burien Code regarding Critical Areas and use of Integrated Pest Management: http://www.codepublishing.com/wa/Burien/mobile/?pg=Burien19/Burien1940.html

Regarding Cities pest management, pesticides & storm water management: http://www.burienwa.gov/index.aspx?NID=228

Burien Property Maintenance and Building Code / Pests & Rodents : http://www.codepublishing.com/wa/burien/html/Burien15/Burien1540.html

Coyotes in Burien / Coyotes eat rodents: http://b-townblog.com/2012/06/10/videophotos-coyote-pups-frolick-in-burien-backyard-sunday-morning/

Cascade provides pest control in Burien for rats and mice, ants, spiders, yellow jackets, bees and many other pests. Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment!

Cascade Pest Control & Extermination – Burien Washington

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